ROLL OF HONOR

(NO. XV)

ANTIETAM NATIONAL CEMETERY, MARYLAND


This Cemetery is situated in Washington county, Maryland, one mile from Sharpsburg, upon the turnpike road to Boonsboro', near the Antietam creek, and in a central position as regards the battlefield of Antietam. The ground on which it is situated was within the rebel lines on the day of the battle.

The cemetery was commenced by the "Antietam National Cemetery Association, " (A corporation organized under the laws of the State of Maryland about March 23, 1865. )

This Association was composed of members from the different loyal States whose dead are represented in the Cemetery; and the expenditure for the purchase of the site, for its enclosure, (a stone wall) for the erection of a lodge, and other improvements, were defrayed by appropriations made by the Legislatures of these various States. The appropriations, however, proving insufficient to provide for the disinterment, coffining, and re-interment of remains of the dead, a large share of the work was undertaken by the General Government in 1866 and 1867, and completed by them September 4, 1867. The grounds were publicly opened and dedicated on the 17th of the same month.

In addition to one thousand four hundred and seventy-five bodies re-interred here from the battle field of Antietam, (fought September 17, 1862) the remains of all United States soldiers scattered through the counties of Frederick, Washington, and Allegheny, Maryland, including those from the battle field at Monocacy Junction, South Mountain, &c. , and from the Hospital at Clarysville, near Cumberland, Maryland, have been removed to this Cemetery; also all bodies from Harper's Ferry, Virginia and its vicinity.

Nineteen States are represented in this Cemetery. The total number of interments made is 4, 695, of which 2, 903 are known, and 1, 792 are unknown.

The enclosure contains slightly over 9 acres. The grounds are handsomely laid off, partly in a semi-circular form, with a twenty- foot avenue surrounding the whole, and numerous smaller paths intersecting the graves.

A space has been left in the centre for a monument, which is now being erected.

ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY, VIRGINIA


This Cemetery is situated in Fairfax county, Virginia, on the "Arlington Estate, " formerly the residence of the Rebel General Robert E. Lee, about three miles from the city of Washington, on the road to Alexandria, Virginia.

The portion of the estate included within the Cemetery fence, (containing the former mansion, now used as the office of the superintendent) contains about two hundred and three acres.

The interment of the dead was commenced here May 13, 1864, and the grounds now contain the remains of over fifteen thousand deceased Union soldiers. Interments are still being made from the garrison of Washington, and from some of the scattered battlefields in Virginia and Maryland.

Two thousand four hundred and thirty four (2, 434) of those contained in this additional list are " unknown, " their remains having been recovered from various localities within a circuit of twenty five miles of Washington, the greater number of them coming from the battlefields of Bull Run and Manassas; the bodies of these latter are deposited in a large vault of masonry, near the mansion, the opening to which is covered by a granite monument bearing the following inscription:


BENEATH THIS STONE
REPOSE THE BONES OF TWO THOUSAND ONE HUNDRED AND ELEVEN
UNKNOWN SOLDIERS
GATHERED AFTER THE WAR FROM THE FIELDS OF BULL RUN, AND
THE ROUTE TO THE RAPPAHANNOCK.
THEIR REMAINS COULD NOT BE IDENTIFIED,
BUT THEIR NAMES AND DEATHS ARE RECORDED IN THE ARCHIVES OF
THEIR COUNTRY; AND ITS GRATEFUL CITIZENS HONOR THEM AS OF
THEIR NOBLE ARMY OF MARTYRS. MAY THEY REST IN PEACE!

< SEPTEMBER, A. D. 1866

The ground is undulating and beautifully wooded. Easy avenues lead to every part of it, and in the summer the natural beauty is unsurpassed.

The graves are arranged in rectangular blocks, and provided with white wooden tablets bearing the name of the soldier and the number of the grave.

CULPEPER COURT-HOUSE NATIONAL CEMETERY, VIRGINIA.


____________________

This Cemetery is situated in Culpeper county, Virginia, on a knoll on the southeast side of the railroad, about one quarter of a mile from the Railroad Depot, and half a mile from the court house at the village of "Culpeper Court house, " Virginia.

It was established in July, 1866 by Brevet Colonel JAMES GLEASON, A. Q. M. U. S. V. , Acting under the direction of Brevet Brigadier General M. I. LUDINGTON, Q. M. U. S. A. , Chief Quartermaster, Department of Washington.

It is laid out in a square form, with avenues dividing it into four equal sections. In the centre, at the intersection of the avenues, is a raised mound supporting a flagstaff, and surrounded by the graves of a number of officers.

It is enclosed with a neat and substantial white wooden fence, with an arched gateway the main entrance upon which is inscribed in large letters, "U. S. National Cemetery. " At the entrance is also a neat Lodge for the accommodation of the Superintendent.

The remains of twelve officers and one thousand three hundred and nine soldiers ( 1, 321 in all) are interred in this Cemetery.

The walks and avenues are paved with white quartz rock; the graves and grass plats are neatly dressed; and there is an abundant supply of young forest trees growing within the enclosure.

The effect of the whole is pleasing to the eye; and the care which has been taken is creditable to the officers entrusted with the work.

The bodies buried here are mostly those of soldiers who died in hospital during the encampment of the Army of the Potomac at Brandy Station in the winter of 1864-'4, and of those who fell in the various skirmishes at the Rappahannock and Rapidan rivers, in 1863 and 1864; about 351 were brought from the battle field of Cedar Mountain.

COLD HARBOR NATIONAL CEMETERY, VIRGINIA


This Cemetery is located in Hanover county, Virginia, on the farm of Miss Indiana Slaughter, on the Whitehouse road, six miles from Mechanicsville, and ten(10) miles north of Richmond. It contains one and one sixth acre of land and, and 1, 930 graves.

The Cemetery is in square form. Gravel walks, seven feet wide, intersect the ground from north to south and east to west, dividing it into four equal sections.

In the centre a mound is raised, on which is planted a flagstaff, and the national colors are kept flying in all pleasant weather.

In the northern portion of the Cemetery are two large common graves, in which are buried the remains of 889 "Unknown" Union soldiers.

The ground has been enclosed by a neat and substantial wooden white fence. Wooden tablets, giving the name, rank, regiment, company, and date of death, mark each grave, and all care has been taken to improve and beautify this Cemetery which the means at the disposal of the officers would allow.

This Cemetery contains the bodies of many of those who fell in the battles of Mechanicsville, Savage Station, Gaine's Mills, and also of those who fell at Cold Harbor on the 3rd of June, 1864.

WINCHESTER NATIONAL CEMETERY, VIRGINIA


This Cemetery is situated upon the farm of Jacob Baker, near Winchester, Frederick county, Virginia, and contains the remains of 4, 411 Union Soldiers, (of which 2, 087 are known) and 2, 324 are unknown, ) gathered within a radius of 40 miles of Winchester.

It is enclosed with a substantial wooden fence, with gateways at the principal entrances; the graves are sodded and have each a headboard

properly lettered and numbered.

The Cemetery is drained by paved gutters, and the walks and avenues which divide the sections have been well graveled; a lodge has also been built for the accommodation of the Superintendent.

Such other improvements are being gradually made as are necessary for the fit adornment of the grounds.

STAUNTON NATIONAL CEMETERY, VIRGINIA


This Cemetery is situated at Staunton, Augusta county, Virginia, It contains the remains of 749 United States soldiers, of which 230 are known, and 519 are unknown. Each grave has an appropriate head board, properly marked.

It is enclosed by a wooden fence, and divided by gravel walks into four rectangular sections.

At the main entrance is a lodge for the accommodation of the Superintendent; and such other improvements have been made as were necessary for the appropriate adornment of the grounds.

MISCELLANEOUS LOCALITIES


MISCELLANEOUS LOCALITIES IN VIRGINIA


The list of names under this heading comprises those of Union soldiers originally buried at Suffolk, Nansemond county; Yorktown, York county; Front Royal, Warren county; Gloucester Point, Gloucester county; Rappahannock Station, Fauquier county; Williamsburg, James City county; Wilson's Landing, Charles City county; Dinwiddie Court-house, Dinwiddie county; Lynchburg, Campbell county, ; Harrison's Landing, Charles City county; in New Kent county, and Petersburg, Dinwiddie county, and vicinity.

All of their remains have, undoubtedly, been removed long ere this to the National Cemeteries at Yorktown and Petersburg; the original location of the bodies, however, as here shown, it is thought, will be of assistance in their identification by their friends.

The "Rolls of Honor" for Yorktown and Poplar Grove (Petersburg) Cemeteries are not yet ready for publication, but will be printed in one of the ensuing volumes.


Home Preface Background Index Legend Name Listing Bibliography

A Special Research Project created especially for Vermont in the Civil War
by Richard Barry, a Green Mountain Boy!