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Individual Record
Carr, Anson K.
MILITARY SERVICE
Age: 25, credited to Rutland, VT
Unit(s): 9th VT INF
Service: enl 8/16/64, m/i 8/16/64, Pvt, Co. F, 9th VT INF, m/o 6/13/65

See Legend for expansion of abbreviations

VITALS
Birth: 1839, Berkshire, VT
Death: 04/19/1915

Burial: West Cemetery, Middlebury, VT
Marker/Plot: Not recorded
Gravestone researcher/photographer: Jennifer Snoots

Findagrave Memorial #: 0
(There may be a Findagrave Memorial, but we have not recorded it)
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Alias?: None noted
Pension?: Unknown
Portrait?: Unknown
College?: Not Found
Veterans Home?: Not Found
(State digraphs will show that this soldier spent some time in a state or national soldier's home)

Remarks: None
DESCENDANTS

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BURIAL:
Copyright notice
Tombstone

West Cemetery, Middlebury, VT

Check the cemetery for location/directions
and other veterans who may be buried there.



Obituary

News was received Monday of the death at four in the morning of Anson K. Carr of Middlebury at the home of his son, Reid L. Carr, a New York lawyer. Death was caused by arteriosclerosis. Mr. Carr, who was born October 15, 1850, was a resident of Middlebury for 50 years. During the past three years, he made his home with his son in New York. For many years he was an extensive produce dealer here. He leaves no immediate relatives except his son and a cousin, M.S. Carr of Middlebury. His wife, who was Louise Landon, died in 1909. Mr. Carr was a veteran of the Civil War, serving in the 9th Vermont regiment. He was a member of William P. Russett Post of Middlebury and was also adjutant of the Department of Vermont, G.A.R. during the time that Col. A. S. Tracy of Middlebury was commander. He was a strong Republican and held various offices in the town and village. He belonged to the Middlebury Lodge, Knights of Honor, during the years in which it was flourishing. The remains were brought to Middlebury and the funeral services were held at the Methodist Church Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock.

Burlington Free Press, April 22, 1915
Courtesy of Tom Boudreau.