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Chappel, John

MILITARY SERVICE

Age: 53, credited to Grand Isle, VT
Unit(s): 13th VT INF
Service: enl 9/11/62, m/i 10/10/62, Pvt, Co. K, 13th VT INF, m/o 7/21/63

See Legend for expansion of abbreviations

VITALS

Birth: 09/29/1808, Highgate, VT
Death: 03/21/1893

Burial: Episcopal Church Cemetery, Highgate, VT
Marker/Plot: Not recorded
Gravestone researcher/photographer: Tom Ledoux
Findagrave Memorial #: 63568994

MORE INFORMATION

Alias?: None noted
Pension?: Yes, 4/20/1882, VT; widow Sophia, 1/27/1894, VT
Portrait?: Unknown
College?: Not Found
Veterans Home?: Not Found
(If there are state digraphs above, this soldier spent some time in a state or national soldiers' home in that state after the war)

Remarks: 13th Vt. History off-site

DESCENDANTS

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BURIAL:

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Tombstone

Tombstone

Episcopal Cemetery, Highgate Falls, VT

Check the cemetery for location/directions and other veterans who may be buried there.



Biography

JOHN CHAPPELL was from the town of Grand Isle where he enlisted and counted on the quota of that town. At the date of his enlistment August 25th, 1862, he was 53 years and 10 months old, and the oldest man in the brigade, so you can see in this unimportant particular to the credit of Company K must be given of furnishing the oldest person, John Chappell, and the oldest officer. Captain L. D. Clark, who was promoted as major. Comrade Chappell was of French descent, was well preserved for one of his age. Was a quiet, pleasant, good natured and well disposed person, attended to his own business and had no disputes or quarrels with any one. Was quite tall and rather slim, five feet ten inches, blue eyes, light complexion, dark hair and a little gray. His age and other considerations generally excused him from the most arduous duties. He was by trade and occupation a shoemaker and acted as Company K's shoemaker considerable of the time, and therefore excused from other duties.

He was a good man and soldier, honest and true, and in the days that tried men's souls, the march to and the battle of Gettysburg found him at his post of duty, as brave and cool and as active as the best. He returned to Highgate after being mustered out July 21st, 1863, and there spent the rest of his life. He was ever a respected citizen. While it was not his to do great things, yet his life was busy and conscientiously lived the golden rule. He died at Highgate, Vt., 18.., and is buried in the town of Highgate.

Source: Sturtevant's Pictorial History, Thirteenth Regiment, Vermont Volunteers, War of 1861-1865, p. 718