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Danforth, Alonzo W.

MILITARY SERVICE

Age: 19, credited to Bristol, VT
Unit(s): 6th VT INF, VRC
Service: enl 9/30/61, m/i 10/15/61, PVT, Co. A, 6th VT INF, pr CPL 11/1/62, reen 12/15/63, wdd, Salem Heights, 5/3/63, wdd, Wilderness, 5/5/64, tr to 171st Co., 2nd Btln, VRC, 10/11/64, m/o 7/17/65

See Legend for expansion of abbreviations

VITALS

Birth: 03/26/1842, Starksboro, VT
Death: 04/01/1909

Burial: Briggs Hill Cemetery, Bristol, VT
Marker/Plot: Not recorded
Gravestone researcher/photographer: Alan Lathrop
Findagrave Memorial #: 40318707

MORE INFORMATION

Alias?: None noted
Pension?: Yes
Portrait?: Unknown
College?: Not Found
Veterans Home?: Not Found
(If there are state digraphs above, this soldier spent some time in a state or national soldiers' home in that state after the war)

Remarks: None

DESCENDANTS

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BURIAL:

Copyright notice

Tombstone

Briggs Hill Cemetery, Bristol, VT

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Biography

Alonzo Danforth could have been the poster boy for the American Civil War. He was barely of legal age to enlist in the Army in the greatest adventure of his lifetime. He was willing to stand in long lines to answer his President's call for volunteers to put down a rebellion against the established central government of the time. He was eager to commit the next three years of his life to the service of his country in its time of need. He joined to fight in the cause for patriotic not pecuniary reasons. During his service time, he saw some of the most horrific combat action of any Vermont troops in the war. Alonzo was twice wounded, the second time receiving disabling wounds. He survived the war to marry (twice). He earned the respect of his neighbors while he lived out a long life tilling the soil of Addison County. When the time came for him to depart this world, he left behind many friends and admirers who mourned his passing. Only three things marred his existence: he never had any children; he died at a young age; and his death was long and drawn out with a great deal of pain and misery involved.

Alonzo W. (sometimes the middle initial was given as "H") Danforth was born on March 26, 1842 in Starksboro, Vermont.[1] His parents were Ebenezer (Eben) Danforth (1812-1883) and Samantha Meader (1815-1892). Eben had been born in Huntington, Vermont. He and Semantha (sic) were married on December 28, 1835 in Starksboro. The couple then spent the majority of their adult lives in Bristol. Eben and "Semantha" had three boys while they lived in Starksboro: Franklin (Frank) Clark (1836-1910; Alonzo (1842-1909); and William W. (1844-1873). The sons were raised in Bristol from about 1850 onward. The youngest boy's life, William's), was very brief being cut short by typhoid fever in 1873 while living in Lincoln and working as a day laborer.[2] Eben was a farmer all his life and was very successful at it. His real estate value in 1850 was assessed at $1,000. By 1870, the value of his farm had risen to $2,500. Apparently, Eben's priorities were not geared towards the accumulation of personal possessions, however, as his personal estate was never valued above $200. The austerity of the home may have been a result of Samantha's upbringing. She seemed to have been raised in a Quaker environment. It was curious to note that Eben, Alonzo's father, also died of cancer at seventy-one on September 1, 1883 in Bristol.[3]

As for "Semantha", she came from a humble background also. Her father, Andrew Meader (aka Meeder, Meder, 1783-1866) was a farmer his whole life as well. He was born in New Hampshire. He married a Quaker girl named Mary "Molly" Meader on September 5, 1805 in Ferrisburgh, Vermont. Together they had three daughters and one son: Diantha (1812-1893); Semantha (sic) (1815-1892); Phebe C. (1818-1916; and little brother, Samuel Heath (1822-1885 all born in Starksboro. From 1850 until 1866, Andrew lived with his son-in-law and daughter, Alonzo Wright and Phebe C., in Bristol. Andrew lost his wife, Molly, in 1856. Ten years later, he, too, passed on.[4] As Semantha grew up, she was exposed to the teachings and values of the Quaker faith which, undoubtedly, was passed on to her children as they grew up. Alonzo's mother and father did seem to adhere to some of the values of living a simple, uncluttered life advocated by the Quaker belief system. But the degree of influence on them seemed to be mitigated by more conventional outside sources. For example, while her parents married at a "Friends' Meeting", "Semantha" chose to be married by a justice of the peace.[5]

By the time Alonzo had reached the age of nineteen in 1860, he had left the nurturing home of his parents, perhaps following his older brother, Frank's, example, to strike out on his own. That left fifteen year old younger brother, William, alone on the farm to help his aging father with the business. That posed little problem for the Danforth family since Eben's father, Peter Danforth, lived right next door to them and could supply some aide in case of an emergency.[6] As a young, virulent man of nineteen years, there was no way Alonzo was going to sit on the sidelines of a patriotic war to save the Union. Like every other teenager in town, his blood was up after April 1861, and he wanted first crack at those Rebs. He couldn't ignore his country's call for help. He had to do his part for the better good of everyone in the Union. Besides, he wanted to put on one of those dark blue uniforms with the shiny brass buttons on it that flashed in the sunlight so nicely. The least he would get out of joining would be to have the adventure of a lifetime. And, maybe, he would get to do something in the course of his enlistment that would earn him a medal and a hero's welcome when he came home. Maybe he would even get a parade down main street in his honor! So, on September 30, 1861, in Bristol, Vermont, an excited young volunteer stood before Captain G. Parker and signed over his life to the U.S, Government for the next three years. The red-headed, five feet ten-inch farm boy with a light complexion and gray eyes from Starksboro scribbled his name in cursive on his enlistment papers.[7] A few weeks later, Private Danforth was called on to report to Montpelier, Vermont to be mustered-in to Company A, Sixth Vermont Infantry on October 15, 1861.[8]

The Sixth Vermont Regiment was raised from volunteers in all parts of the State within two weeks from the time Secretary of War Stanton contacted Vermont's Governor Erastus Fairbanks following the debacle of First Bull Run in July of 1861. Within thirty-three days of its formation and acceptance into the service of the United States Army, the Sixth was en route to its first duty station in Washington, D.C. It was immediately sent to Camp Griffin near Lewinsville, Virginia where it joined the Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth regiments to form the First Vermont Brigade - the "Old Vermont Brigade". During the winter cantonment at Camp Griffin, the Sixth suffered terribly from diseases. There were 278 cases of typhoid fever, 330 of measles, 90 of diphtheria, and 180 of mumps. Being used to clean air, isolation, eating wholesome and plentiful food and getting robust exercise doing their chores, the Vermonters were decimated by the cramped contact with urban carriers of diseases they had no immunity to, subjected to monotonous meals ill prepared and infrequently supplied, exposed to the elements and exhaustive duties and surrounded by sickness caused by the lack of reasonable sanitation in the camps perpetuated by the careless and torpid behavior of indifferent campmates. The mortality among the vulnerable Vermonters was great, amounting to more than 50 deaths. Without any natural immunities to their infectious companions and considering the exposure and poor diet they were subjected to, the results in the ranks of the Vermonters was very similar to that which occurred among the native Americans of this country after their initial contact with white Europeans in the early settlement period of our history.

The Vermonters were glad to break their first winter camp on March 10, 1862 to take part in the Peninsula Campaign. It suffered severe losses at Savage Station along with other Vermont Brigade units. The Regiment did its share of fighting during the Maryland Campaign and served an active role at Fredericksburg. It went into winter camp in 1862 at White Oak Church. When it broke camp in the spring of 1863, it joined in the Chancellorsville movement. There, and at Gettysburg and Funkstown, the Sixth distinguished itself in combat. After being a part of the Mine Run Campaign of 1863, the Regiment went into winter quarters at Brandy Station, Virginia. In the Wilderness Campaign of 1864, the Sixth was subjected to arduous and tragic work, suffering terrible losses. It was part of the famous assault at Spotsylvania and was repeatedly in action at Cold Harbor. Soon after arriving at Petersburg, the Sixth Corps, of which the Vermont Brigade was a part, was ordered to the defenses of Washington. They rejoined the Army of the Potomac in December of 1864 for the remainder of the Petersburg siege. In October 1864, the original members not re-enlisted were mustered-out. After Lee's surrender at Appomattox, the rest of the Regiment was mustered out on June 19, 1865.

The total number of members in the Sixth amounted to 1,681. Of that number, one hundred eighty-nine were killed in action or died of wounds; one hundred eighty-nine died of disease; twenty died while in Confederate prisons; and two died accidentally.[12] The Sixth Vermont Regiment was raised from volunteers in all parts of the State within two weeks from the time Secretary of War Stanton contacted Vermont's Governor Erastus Fairbanks following the debacle of First Bull Run in July of 1861. Within thirty-three days of its formation and acceptance into the service of the United States Army, the Sixth was enroute to its first duty station in Washington, D.C. It was immediately sent to Camp Griffin near Lewinsville, Virginia where it joined the Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth regiments to form the First Vermont Brigade - the "Old Vermont Brigade". During the winter cantonment at Camp Griffin, the Sixth suffered terribly from diseases. There were 278 cases of typhoid fever, 330 of measles, 90 of diphtheria and 180 of mumps. Being used to clean air, isolation, eating wholesome and plentiful food and getting robust exercise doing their chores, the Vermonters were decimated by the cramped contact with urban carriers of diseases they had no immunity to, subjected to monotonous meals ill prepared and infrequently supplied, exposed to the elements and exhaustive duties and surrounded by sickness caused by the lack of reasonable sanitation in the camps perpetuated by the careless and torpid behavior of indifferent campmates. The mortality among the vulnerable Vermonters was great, amounting to more than 50 deaths. Without any natural immunities to their infectious companions and considering the exposure and poor diet they were subjected to, the results in the ranks of the Vermonters was very similar to that which occurred among the native Americans of this country after their initial contact with white Europeans in the early settlement period of our history.

The Vermonters were glad to break their first winter camp on March 10, 1862 to take part in the Peninsula Campaign. It suffered severe losses at Savage Station along with other Vermont Brigade units. The Regiment did its share of fighting during the Maryland Campaign and served an active role at Fredericksburg. It went into winter camp in 1862 at White Oak Church. When it broke camp in the spring of 1863, it joined in the Chancellorsville movement. There, and at Gettysburg and Funkstown, the Sixth distinguished itself in combat. After being a part of the Mine Run Campaign of 1863, the Regiment went into winter quarters at Brandy Station, Virginia. In the Wilderness Campaign of 1864, the Sixth was subjected to arduous and tragic work, suffering terrible losses. It was part of the famous assault at Spotsylvania and was repeatedly in action at Cold Harbor. Soon after arriving at Petersburg, the Sixth Corps, of which the Vermont Brigade was a part, was ordered to the defenses of Washington. They rejoined the Army of the Potomac in December of 1864 for the remainder of the Petersburg siege. In October 1864, the original members not re-enlisted were mustered-out. After Lee's surrender at Appomattox, the rest of the Regiment was mustered out on June 19, 1865.

The total number of members in the Sixth amounted to 1,681. Of that number, one hundred eighty-nine were killed in action or died of wounds; one hundred eighty-nine died of disease; twenty died while in Confederate prisons; and two died accidentally.[9] May 5, 1864, the deadliest day in the history of the State of Vermont, began with a brilliant sunrise. It was a perfectly beautiful warm spring morning both in the Green Mountain State and the tangled woods of northern Virginia. For the men of the Old Vermont Brigade (the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th VT Regiments), the day would soon feel like the bowels of eternal Hades. The day before, May 4, General Ulysses S. Grant had launched his 1864 Overland Campaign by assembling he Army of the Potomac at the northern edge of a densely wooded area known locally as The Wilderness. So heavily wooded was this tract of land that some claimed if a man were to be chased through it at a run, he would come out the other side naked! In the middle of it was an intersection of two very important roads; the north-south Brock Road and he east-west Orange Plank Road. Grant intended to use the Brock Road to pass through the compact woods on his march towards Richmond. Lee was headed for the Orange Plank Road to intercept him in a trap in the middle of the jungle of vegetation where large formation maneuvering would be impossible.[10]

The Vermont Brigade, and the rest of the Fifth and Sixth Corps of the Army of the Potomac, camped at the northern edge of The Wilderness near a tavern on May 4 to wait for the Union supply train to catch up. At noon on the 5th, the Vermonters received orders from commanders Lewis Grant and General Meade to advance into the interior of The Wilderness as far as the undefended cross roads of the Brock and Orange Plank Roads where they were to "hold the cross roads at all hazards until the arrival of the Second Corps." Union General George Getty sent three of his four brigades to secure the objective: Wheaton's Brigade consisting mostly of Pennsylvania troops; Eustis' Brigade consisting of Massachusetts and Rhode Islanders; and the Old Vermont Brigade led by Lewis Grant. Altogether, these three brigades amounted to about 6,000 men.[11] By marching at the double quick along the narrow, muddy Brock Road for a distance of two miles, the Federals were able to beat the Confederates to the valuable cross roads, but barely. Getty reported: "On approaching the cross-roads our cavalry was found hastily retiring. I reached the (intersection) just as the enemy's skirmishers appeared. Wheaton's Brigade was brought up. faced front, and a volley poured in." When the Union skirmishers moved into the woods, "The rebel dead and wounded were found within 30 yards of the cross-roads." [12] From prisoners, Getty learned that he was facing two divisions (20,000+) of Confederates with an under-strength division of his own (6,000+ men). Lewis Grant put his 3,000 man Vermont Brigade (five regiments) a little south of the Orange Plank Road with the Brock Road at their backs. The only open spots the Vermonters faced were the roads themselves. Otherwise, they only could see an impenetrable wall of brush, brambles, saplings and small trees. While they waited, they built low breastworks out of logs, rotten wood, fences, anything found lying around loose. When not busy with this task, they ate hardtack and sipped from their canteens.[13] For two hours the men lay behind their crude, low breastworks watching and waiting. Back at the Wilderness Tavern, an uneasy and nervous Ulysses S. Grant paced.

Tired of waiting and fearful of an assault by an overwhelming force, General Grant sent orders to Getty to advance and attack. The Vermonters were the first to plunge into the thickly standing trees, dense underbrush and tangling vines. After taking about ten steps into the woods, the advancing Vermonters were met with a terrific volley of musketry from the main battle line of the Confederates. Seth Eastman of the Sixth Vermont said: "The rifle balls came in showers and cut the underbrush down to about as high as a soldier's belt. In a short time the air became thick and sulfurous and reduced the light down to twilight, but we fought on." [14] According to Eastman, Confederate prisoners taken the next day had been told not to fire at the Vermonters "until they could see the whites of their eyes." After the first Rebel volley, Eastman laid down on his belly which was a much safer position to fight from. From that position, he observed what was happening around him:

"On went the struggle amid the constricting trees and saplings, brush and brambles, vines and thorns, a dim and green hell filled with smoke and thunderous noise. Death and maiming came from unseen sources. A Vermonter might catch a glimpse of some vague shape moving off to the front in the dense fog of battle. More likely, all that was seen of the enemy was the flash of muzzles roll of smoke. Bullets clipped limbs and branches and mowed down saplings with a whipping sound. A telling thud too often meant that a comrade had been hit, and he would scream or moan, or more often roll over silently and endure, or die. The bullets struck everywhere, smashing faces, disemboweling, shattering arms and legs, ripping through chests, blowing away brains and hearts, bursting through lungs, destroying hands, feet, private parts.[15]

The fighting on May 5, 1864 ended about eight o'clock (p.m.). Benedict, an officer in one of the Old Brigade's regiments, wrote of the day's fight: "Of five colonels of the brigade but one was left unhurt. Fifty of its best line officers had been killed or wounded. A thousand Vermont soldiers fell that afternoon." A Vermont officer wrote to the Bennington Banner that after being in Lewis Grant's headquarters late on May 5: "I found the general at his post with only one staff officer leftThe general appeared almost worn out, and when he informed me that his losses in his brigade were near half of his command, and his staff all killed or disabled, his emotions were very great."[16] The Wilderness was the last fight of the war for many Vermonters of the Old Brigade including Corporal Alonzo W. Danforth.

Private Alonzo had received his promotion to Corporal back on November 1, 1862.[17] When the Sixth Vermont went into winter quarters at Brandy Station in December, 1863, Corporal Danforth was discharged so he could re-enlist for a second term of service as a Veteran Volunteer in the Sixth Vermont. His second tour of duty began December 15, 1863.[18] In January of 1864, the Corporal was granted a leave of absence.[19] Many of those who volunteered to re-enlist at Brandy Station in December, 1863, were granted a thirty day furlough as a reward. He was also paid a $100 bonus for re-enlisting.[20] Corporal Danforth was present for duty at Brandy Station throughout the months prior to his wounding at The Wilderness. His compiled service records showed he was slightly wounded in the Salem Heights engagement two days before he received his disabling wound of his right forearm and hand that ended his combat career.[21] According to records, the wound caused damage to the "flexer muscles of hand impairing movement of wrist (and) two fingers." [22] One of those fingers might have been his index finger on the right hand. This finger, sometimes called the "trigger finger", was important for pulling the trigger to fire a musket or revolver. A stiff right wrist and trigger finger would make it very difficult for anyone to load and fire a weapon such as those used in the Civil War.

Over the five months after the Battle of the Wilderness, Corporal Danforth spent his time recuperating from his injuries in three different hospitals. Immediately after his May 5th wounding, he was sent to the General Hospital at Brattleboro, Vermont. Sometime in May or early June, he was sent to Grant General Hospital at Willet's Point, New York Harbor. On June 29, 1864, the Corporal was transferred back to Brattleboro where he spent the months of July, August and September. By October 10. Alonzo was a patient in Baxter General Hospital in Burlington, Vermont. He was there for fifteen days when the doctors made the determination that Corporal Danforth was completely unfit for the duties required of a soldier in the field and recommended that he serve the rest of his time in the military as a member of the Veterans' Reserve Corps (VRC). His disabilities did not prevent him from performing less strenuous support duties such as being a guard for POWs or enforcing military discipline in the Provost Marshal's Department. Better news for Alonzo came in the form of his being paid a $110 bounty with another $290 due him. And, after spending $36.71 for fresh clothing, he was still due $2.72.[23] Corporal Danforth was still at Brattleboro on October 28, 1864.[24] He wasn't transferred to the VRC until December 10 by order of the Provost Marshal General.[25] Alonzo served out the remainder of his tour of duty with the Union Army in the defenses of Washington, D.C. until he was discharged on June 26, 1865.[26]

Alonzo the civilian returned to Bristol a little older (twenty-three) and a whole lot wiser. Four months after his military career ended, he applied for, and was granted, a monthly invalid pension based on his gun shot wounds of $10 per month.[27] The young man certainly deserved it. He had served almost four years in the army, volunteering twice to be a member of the Sixth Vermont Infantry. He was wounded twice in combat, the second time severely enough to be sent to the VRC branch of the service. This was where soldiers too disabled to stay in the field yet still capable of performing some light duty were sent to complete their terms of service. He was promoted from private to corporal during his tour of duty. He had a guaranteed income from the Government for life which he could have lived off of if he was careful and not too extravagant in his spending. Instead, he returned to his father's farm and took up being a farmer next to his father and his brother, William. But this arrangement did not last very long, By the 1870 Federal Census, "Even" (sic) Danforth and Samantha Danforth were living in an empty nest. William was in his mid-twenties by then and was off on his own somewhere. As for Alonzo, he had learned that there was more in the world than just the green mountains and valleys of the Champlain Valley. Besides, a lot of his comrades and neighbors where heading west, following the advice of a well-known journalist who was egging young men to move to new territory beyond the settled east coast. He was still single, young and curious. Whether he joined the great migration west with the others or simply wandered out there by himself, he appeared to be in Minnesota when the 1870 Federal Census was taken. He worked on a very prosperous farm owned by William Wait. The farm was valued at $8,000 in 1870, and William's personal possessions added another $1,500 to the total value of his estate. Alonzo was a farm hand working full time along with the owner, forty-two year old William Wait, and his sixteen year old son, Frederick. Ellen Wait, the matriarch of the family, had a domestic servant assisting her with the household chores.[28] On the surface, it appeared that Alonzo had it made out in Minnesota working for Mr. Wait. But something wasn't right, and he ended up back in Vermont by 1878.

June 6, 1878 marked the day that Alonzo married. His bride was Twenty-six year old Armenia Amenia "Mina" Soper (1851-1881). She was born on July 9 in Plattsburgh, New York, the daughter of Cornelius Soper (1813-1896) and Minerva Frank (1824-1906). The were married by a minister, S. Knowlton, in Bristol. She came from a small, modest family of three children. Mina had lived in Lincoln since she was eight years old. In 1880, the newlyweds were living with Alonzo's parents in Bristol. The Federal Census for that year did not list any occupation for Alonzo, but, since he and his wife were living in Eben's home, eating at his dining table and sleeping in the spare room of his house, it would seem only reasonable that he was helping his sixty-eight year old farming father do the work necessary to run the business. Alonzo's first marriage did not last long. Mina was wracked by consumption and died just three years after the wedding on April 6, 1881.[29] She and Alonzo never had the opportunity to start a family of their own.

Not all of Alonzo's luck in the 1880s was bad however. Two years after losing his first wife, he found a replacement. Ida C. Lamb was her name and she came from the Lincoln-Starksboro area. She was born August 4, 1856 in Starksboro. Ida was the daughter of Samuel S. Lamb (1820-1899) and Mary M. Dike (1835-1915). Her father was a very successful farmer in Lincoln having created an agricultural enterprise worth $4,000 in 1870. Samuel's personal property was assessed as being worth another $1,300. His farm was doing well enough for Samuel to support his wife and three daughters plus one hired man to work on the farm.[30] Ida was twenty-seven when she married forty-one year old Alonzo on March 21, 1883. Before marrying Alonzo, Ida had worked as a domestic servant in the home of Levi Hasseltine, a local doctor in Bristol. She had worked in the doctor's home as a servant for at least three years previous to her marriage. [31] That fall, September 1, 1883, Alonzo received both good and bad news simultaneously. The bad news was that his father, Ebenezer, passed away from cancer.[32] The good news was that his mother, Samantha, and his brother, Franklin, the only other heirs to Eben's estate, both agreed to sign over any interest they had in some farm land that Eben co-owned with his father, Peter Danforth to Alonzo. It only amounted to about thirty acres, but it was land along the New Haven River. It bordered land owned by Peter Danforth, his grandfather, Mahitable Danforth, his grandmother, and Francis Briggs in the east part of town. The transfer of ownership was official on June 30, 1884 after the lands earmarked to go with the homestead farm house and outbuildings which had been set aside for Samantha were all drawn up. Many of these land acquisitions were recorded in detail in the Bristol Town Land Records, Volume 10, p. 244 and Volume 15, p. 74.[33]

When the Government took its special canvass of surviving soldiers, sailors and marines and widows, etc. in 1890, Alonzo emerged on it as a resident of Bristol. The information included in the schedule confirmed Alonzo's membership in the Sixth Vermont Volunteers as a Corporal in Company A. He served from September30, 1861 to July 17, 1865, a period of three years, nine months and sixteen days.[34] In 1898, Alonzo, still farming but in Lincoln now, became an important witness, along with his wife, Ida, in a murder trial. The case involved the untimely death of a young lady from Lincoln. According to Alonzo, on the day of the alleged murder, the man accused of committing the crime stopped by Alonzo's farm to ask him for a ride to the train station in New Haven. Even though he was offered money for the ride, Alonzo declined claiming it was too late in the afternoon to be gallivanting around the countryside. Ida gave testimony collaborating Alonzo's statements.[35]

The turn of the century found Alonzo, now in his sixties, still tilling the soil in Bristol. He and Ida lived alone on the farm. Their land abutted that of Francis Briggs and his wife, Janet. There had been no children born to the couple in their seventeen year marriage. Alonzo was still working everyday on the farm all by himself.[36] But Alonzo's "golden years" were wracked with terrible pain and suffering from cancer of the lips and neck "epithelioma". Those who knew him said he never complained of his condition, however. He managed to hold on until April 1, 1909 when he finally was overcome by his disease. He died in Bristol at the age of sixty-seven and one half years old. His obituary in the local paper said of him: "A good man, a firm believer in doing right and being kind to all, "Lon" Danforth, as he was familiarly called, will be missed and sincerely mourned by a wide circle of friends." Indeed, he had a very wide circle of friends as his funeral service in his home was largely attended by folks from not only Lincoln and Bristol, but also from Brandon, Middlebury, Monkton and Starksboro.[37] His widow, Ida, applied for a widow's pension within a month of Alonzo's passing. It was granted May 6, 1909 and paid until her death in her brother Edward's home in Monkton of heart disease aggravated by rheumatism. She, too, spent most of her final years in distress and agony.[38]

NOTES

1. www.ancestry.com, Devine-Burritt Family Tree for Alonzo H. Danforth; Find A Grave, Memorial #40318707 for Alonzo W. Danforth.
2. Ibid., Vermont, Vital Records, Death for Danforth, William.
3. Ibid., Devine-Burritt Family Tree for Ebenezer "Eben" Danforth. Note: The personal information about Eben came from the Devine-Burritt Family Tree.
4. Ibid., Devine-Burritt Family Tree for Andrew Meader; Ibid., 1850 & 1860 U.S. Federal Census for Andrew Meder (sic)/Andrew Meader (sic); www.familysearch.org, Vermont, Vital Records, 1732-2005, Marriage for Molly Heath; www.ancestry.com, Vermont, Vital Records, Marriage for Andrew Meader; Ibid., Vermont, Vital Records, Birth for Andrew Meader; Ibid., Vermont, Vital Records, Death for Andrew Meader.
5. www.ancestry.com, Devine-Burritt Family Tree for Ebenezer "Eben" Danforth.
6. Ibid., 1860 U.S. Federal Census for E. Danforth.
7. www.fold3.com, Compiled Service Record For Union Soldiers Who Served In Organizations From the State of Vermont, image 311612057. Herein-after referred to as Compiled Service Records.
8. Ibid., Compiled Service Record, image 311612060.
9. Vermont in the Civil War/Units/1st Brigade/Sixth Vermont Infantry/History.
10. The Battered Stars by Howard Coffin, Countryman Press, Woodstock, VT, 2002, pp. 93-95.
11. Ibid., pp. 100-101.
12. Ibid., pp. 102-103.
13. Ibid., pp. 103-104.
14. Ibid., p. 106.
15. Ibid., pp. 112-113.
16. Ibid., p.123
17. www.fold3.com, Compiled Service Record, image 311612092.
18. Ibid., image 311612126.
19. Ibid., image 311612204.
20. Ibid., image 311612120.
21. www.vermontcivilwar.org/Danforth, Alonzo W./military service; www.Fold3.com, Compiled Service Record, image 311612170.
22. www.fold3.com, Compiled Service Record, image 311612170 & ...176.
23. Ibid., Compiled Service Record, images 311612140, ...142, ...152, ...156, ...161, ...170, ...176.
24. Ibid, image 311612192.
25. Ibid., image 311612210.
26. Ibid., image 311612210.
27. www.newspapers.com, Rutland Daily Herald, Sat., Oct. 13, 1883; www.fold3.com, General Pension Index for Durfey, Prosper, Jr.
28. www.myheritage.com, 1870 U.S. Federal Census for Alonzo W. Denforth (sic).
29. www.findagrave.com, Memorial #105365374 for Armenia Amenia "Mina" Soper; www.ancestry.com, Morse/Brown Family Tree for Mina Armenia M. Soper; Ibid., 1860 & 1870 U.S. Federal Census for Almina (sic) Soper & Amina Saper (sic); Ibid., 1880 U.S. Federal Census Alonzo W. Danforth; Ibid., Vermont, Vital Records, Death for Danforth, Mina (Saper).
30. www.ancestry.com, Devine-Burritt Family Tree for Ida C. Lamb; Ibid., 1870 U.S. Federal Census for Ida Lamb.
31. Ibid., Vermont, Vital Records, Marriage for Alonzo H. Danforth & Ida C. Lamb; Ibid., 1880 U.S. Federal Census for Ida C. Lamb.
32. Ibid., Devine-Burritt Family Tree for Ebenezer "Eben" Danforth.
33. Ibid., Vermont, Willa and Probate Records, 1749-1999 for Ebenezer Danforth.
34. Ibid., 1890 Special Schedule for Alonzo W. Danforth.
35. www.newspapers.com, The Boston Globe, Fri., Feb. 11, 1898. More details about the murder trial can be found in the Aldophus J. Cushman article.
36. www.ancestry.com, U.S. Federal Census for Alonzo Danforth.
37. www.newspapers.com, Bristol Herald, Thu., Apr. 8, 1909; www.ancestry.com, Vermont, Vital Records, Death for Alonzo W. Danforth.
38. www.newspapers.com, Bristol Herald, Thu., Mar. 30, 1916; www.ancestry.com, Vermont, Vital Records, Death for Mrs. Ida Lamb Danforth; Ibid., U.S. Civil War Pension Records for Danforth, Alonzo W.

Courtesy of Bernie Noble.

Obituary

The funeral of Alonzo Danforth was held Sunday afternoon, the Rev. Mender officiated, with burial on Briggs Hill.

Source: Burlington Free Press, April 8, 1909
Courtesy of Deanna French

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