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Fairbrother, Dighton H.

MILITARY SERVICE

Age: 19, credited to Westminster, VT
Unit(s): 11th VT INF
Service: enl 12/5/63, m/i 12/9/63, Pvt, Co. G, 11th VT INF, tr to Co. D, 6/24/65, m/o 8/25/65

See Legend for expansion of abbreviations

VITALS

Birth: 02/09/1844, Westminster, VT
Death: 06/22/1910

Burial: New Westminster Cemetery, Westminster, VT
Marker/Plot: Not recorded
Gravestone researcher/photographer: Bob Edwards
Findagrave Memorial #: 136480820

MORE INFORMATION

Alias?: None noted
Pension?: Yes, 10/18/1890, VT; widow Clara E., 7/11/1910, VT
Portrait?: Italo Collection
College?: Not Found
Veterans Home?: Not Found
(If there are state digraphs above, this soldier spent some time in a state or national soldiers' home in that state after the war)

Remarks: None

Webmaster's Note: The 11th Vermont Infantry was also known as the 1st Vermont Heavy Artillery; the names were used interchangably for most of its career


DESCENDANTS

Great Grandfather of Sylvia Doray, Henderson, NV

2nd Great Grandfather of Richard Doray, Erie, PA

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BURIAL:

Copyright notice

Tombstone

Tombstone

New Westminster Cemetery, Westminster, VT

Check the cemetery for location/directions and other veterans who may be buried there.



Photo

Ed Italo Collection

Obituary

Despondent Man Commits Suicide

Dighton H. Fairbrother, aged 66 years, committed suicide by hanging June 23, at his barn a mile south of Westminster village at the old Henry Wells farm.

Mr. Fairbrother was discouraged over his financial prospects.

That night he sat upon the doorstep at his home and talked with a farm hand about his situation. Later he was seen by his housekeeper to enter the barn. Mistrusting his action the housekeeper started to look for him and found him hanging from a beam in the bay loft.

Mr. Fairbrother is survived by an invalid wife, three sons, two daughters.

Source: Middlebury Register, July 1, 1910.
Courtesy of Tom Boudreau.