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Individual Record
Luce, Simon D.
MILITARY SERVICE
Age: 24, credited to Morristown, VT
Unit(s): 5th VT INF, VRC
Service: enl 8/14/61, m/i 9/16/61, Pvt, Co. D, 5th VT INF, tr to VRC 9/30/63, m/o 11/18/65

See Legend for expansion of abbreviations

VITALS
Birth: 09/27/1836, Stowe, VT
Death: 05/20/1927

Burial: Riverside Cemetery, Morrisville, VT
Marker/Plot: 19
Gravestone researcher/photographer: Denis & Karen Jaquish

Findagrave Memorial #: 0
(There may be a Findagrave Memorial, but we have not recorded it)
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Alias?: None noted
Pension?: Unknown
Portrait?: 1907 Reunion, Co. D, 5th VVI
College?: Not Found
Veterans Home?: Not Found
(State digraphs will show that this soldier spent some time in a state or national soldier's home)

Remarks: None
DESCENDANTS

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BURIAL:
Copyright notice
Tombstone

Tombstone

Riverside Cemetery, Morrisville, VT

Check the cemetery for location/directions
and other veterans who may be buried there.



Simon D. Luce



(John Gibson Collection)

Morrisville News and Citizen, May 25, 1927

S.D. LUCE OF MORRISVILLE, CIVIL WAR VETERAN

DIES AT AGE 90 YEARS

WAS OLDEST MEMBER OF J.M. WARNER POST, NO. 4 G.A.R.

HELD POST CANE

Simon D. Luce was born in Stowe on Sept. 27, 1836, and died in Morrisville May 20, 1927, at the age of 90 years, seven months and 23 days, being the last of his family, his parents dying when he was but four years old. The greater part of his life was spent in this vicinity, coming to Morrisville to reside 44 years ago.

Mr. Luce was a veteran of the Civil War, serving in Company D, Fifth Vermont infantry for three years, then re-enlisting in Company C., Ninth Regiment of Veteran Reserve Corps, serving until the end of the war, and holding the rank of Sargeant when he received an honorable discharge in Washington, D.C. At the time of his death he was the oldest member of J.M. Warner Post N. 4, G.A.R., and therefore held the post cane. As long as health permitted he was a faithful member and deeply interested in the local W.R.C., and all patriotic work.

After the war Mr. Luce took the trade of stone mason work, which he followed during the greater part of his active life. Oct. 22, 1868, he was married to Olive R. Warren of Elmore, who survives him. To this union one child was born who died in infancy.

The funeral service, preceded by a brief prayer service at the home, was held at the Universalist Church, of which Mr. Luce was a member, on Sunday afternoon and was conducted by the pastor, Rev. Donald K. Evans, assisted by the Rev. George F. Fortier. The bearers were Walter Sargent and Fred Peck, members of the church, and Elmer Camp and Pola St.Louis of the Sons Of Veterans. The G.A.R., W.R.C., Sons of Veterans, and Auxillary, and the American Legion and Auxillary all attended in a body. Interment was in the family lot at Riverside Cemetery, and was in charge of the G.A.R., assisted by a firing squad and bugler from the American Legion and was most impressively done.

Mr. Luce was well known throughout the community, respected and loved by those that knew him. In failing health for several years, being confined to the home and his chair the past two years, always hopeful, always cheerful, and never complaining of his condition. His cheery face and his wave of greeting had been familiar to old and young who passed his window.

There were present from out of town, Mr. & Mrs. J. Robertson of Pasumpsic, Mr. & Mrs. H.R. Blodgett from St.Johnsbury, Mr. &. Mrs D.J. Griffith, and son Edward of Waterbury, Arthur Newcomb of Waterbury Center, Mrs. Minnie C. Tinkham department president of the W.R.C., Mrs. Maude T. Pike, department secretary of the W.R.C., Miss Ida Harris, Mr. &. Mrs W.D. Pangle, all of Stowe, and Clarence W. Putnam of North Wolcott.

The floral remembrances were many and beautiful, and included set pieces from the different organizations, and from friends and neighbors.

The following lines, read by the Rev. Mr. Evans at the service were written by C.A. Lamson, of Sarasota, Fla., and sent to Mr. Luce when he read in the home paper of Mr. Luce's serious condition. Being so appropriate for the deceased we give them space here.

DRIFTING

SOME SAY I HAVE BEEN DRIFTING,

THAT MY BOAT GOES WITH THE TIDE,

THAT THE OARS ARE LYING IDLE,

SIMPLY RESTING BY MY SIDE.

BUT I KNOW THAT JUST BESIDE ME,

THERE"S A HAND THAT"S PRESSING MINE.

SEEING ONLY THAT MY DRIFTING

IS A PART OF LIFE SUBLIME.

Submitted by Deanna French.