Vermont Flag Site Logo

Individual Record
Green, William A.
MILITARY SERVICE
Age: 20, credited to Franklin, VT
Unit(s): 6th VT INF
Service: enl 9/30/61, m/i 10/15/61, CPL, Co. K, 6th VT INF, mwia, Funkstown, 7/10/63, d/wds 7/14/63

See Legend for expansion of abbreviations

VITALS
Birth: abt 1841, Swanton, VT
Death: 07/14/1863

Burial: Mount Olivet Cemetery, Frederick, MD
Marker/Plot: Not recorded
Gravestone researcher/photographer:

Findagrave Memorial #: 0
(There may be a Findagrave Memorial, but we have not recorded it)

Cenotaph: St. Marys Cemetery, Franklin, VT
Marker/Plot:
Gravestone researcher/photographer: Tom Ledoux

Findagrave Memorial #: 0
(There may be a Findagrave Memorial, but we have not recorded it)
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Alias?: None noted
Pension?: Unknown
Portrait?: Unknown
College?: Not Found
Veterans Home?: Not Found
(State digraphs will show that this soldier spent some time in a state or national soldier's home)

Remarks: None
DESCENDANTS

(Are you a descendant, but not listed? Register today)

BURIAL:
Copyright notice
Mount Olivet Cemetery, Frederick, MD
Check the cemetery for location/directions
and other veterans who may be buried there.


CENOTAPH:

Tombstone

Tombstone

Tombstone

Cenotaph in Saint Marys Cemetery, Franklin, VT

Check the cemetery for location/directions
and other veterans who may be buried there.

William A. Green

St. Albans Daily Messenger

August 6, 1863

Serg't Wm. A. Green, Co. K, 6th Reg't Vt. Vols.

Among the brave boys who fell in the battle near Funkstown, Md., was the son of Hon. Alonzo Green of Franklin. He was wounded in the thigh by a ball and died on the 14th of July at Frederick city, Md., aged 20 years and 7 months.

Young Green entered the service of the United States in Sept. 1861, and was with the army of the Potomac during the seven days fighting before Richmond. At Harrison's Landing he was sent home on detached duty. It was not long however, before he re-joined his Co. - was in the battle of Fredericksburg and remained with the army until he was wounded.

Cheerfully he endured every hardship and privation. When almost exhausted with hunger and thirst, or foot sore and weary by long and rapid marches, no murmuring or complaining words escaped his lips. He endured as the patriot soldier endures.

Not long since an easier and less dangerous situation was offered him, but he declined it, preferring to remain with his comrades - endure the hardships and brave the dangers with them and if need be (as he did) yield his life on the Altar of his country. After he was wounded he exhibited the same cheerful disposition counting pain and hardships, privation and want, as nothing if he could but see this unnatural and fratricidal war ended and peace returned to his country. But his sufferings are over - he has made his lat march and lain down to rest till the long roll is called on the resurrection morning.

Contributed by Tom Boudreau.