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Ray, Willard

MILITARY SERVICE

Age: 19, credited to Hinesburg, VT
Unit(s): 7th VT INF, 1st US Vet Corps
Service: enl 2/1/62, m/i 2/12/62, Pvt, Co. A, 7th VT INF, pr CPL, m/o 8/20/64; enl 2/10/65, Hancock's 1st A.C., 4th Regt., Co. C, m/o 2/9/66

See Legend for expansion of abbreviations

VITALS

Birth: 1842, Hinesburg, VT
Death: 09/21/1881

Burial: Village Cemetery, Hinesburg, VT
Marker/Plot: Not recorded
Gravestone researcher/photographer: Deb Robichaud Belcher
Findagrave Memorial #: 226327379

MORE INFORMATION

Alias?: None noted
Pension?: Not found
Portrait?: Unknown
College?: Not Found
Veterans Home?: Not Found
(If there are state digraphs above, this soldier spent some time in a state or national soldiers' home in that state after the war)

Remarks: Drowned at Split Rock, Lake Champlain, body recovered and sent to Hinesburg.

DESCENDANTS

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BURIAL:

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Gravestone

Gravestone

Village Cemetery, Hinesburg, VT

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Obituary

Drowned Mr. Willard Ray of Hinesburgh was drowned at Split Rock, in Lake Champlain, about half past two o'clock, yesterday afternoon, while out pole fishing. Up to 7 p. m. Last evening the body had not been found. The full particulars of the fatality are not yet learned.

Source: Burlington Free Press, September 22, 1881.

Body Recovered. - After three days' unceasing toil with grapplings the body of Mr. Willard Ray was recovered about 3 o'clock Saturday afternoon, some forty feet from where he sank, by Mr. Carl Thompson of Thompson's Point. The body was immediately towed to the Vermont side, and from there taken to Hinesburgh. Messrs. Barton and Thorp rendered valuable service by placing their fine yachts at the disposal of the friends and relatives of the drowned man. Mr. Ray was in fine financial circumstances. He leaves a wife and one child, who have the tenderest sympathies of the entire community in which they live.

Source: Burlington Free Press, September 26, 1881.
Courtesy of Tom Boudreau.