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Adams, Jesse

MILITARY SERVICE

Age: 19, credited to Cavendish, VT
Unit(s): 3rd VT INF
Service: enl 6/1/61, m/i 7/16/61, WGNR, Co. F, 3rd VT INF, d/dis 11/8/61, Regtl Hosp. (Typhoid fever)

See Legend for expansion of abbreviations

VITALS

Birth: 1841, Cavendish, VT
Death: 11/08/1861

Burial: Cavendish Center Cemetery, Cavendish, VT
Marker/Plot: Not recorded
Gravestone researcher/photographer: Joie Finley Morris +
Findagrave Memorial #: 43652228

MORE INFORMATION

Alias?: None noted
Pension?: Yes
Portrait?: Unknown
College?: Not Found
Veterans Home?: Not Found
(If there are state digraphs above, this soldier spent some time in a state or national soldiers' home in that state after the war)

Remarks: None

DESCENDANTS

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BURIAL:

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Tombstone

Tombstone

Tombstone

Cavendish Center Cemetery, Cavendish, VT

Check the cemetery for location/directions and other veterans who may be buried there.


Biography

A Promising Young Vermont Man
Who Died For His Country

Jesse Adams was born in Cavendish, (Windsor County), Vt., 10 August 1842, He never married. He died of disease at Camp Griffith, Virginia at the age of 19 on 8 November 1861.

A Civil War soldier, Jesse joined up as a Pvt. in Co. "F", 3rd Reg't, Vt. Vols. also known as the Hartford, Vt. Company. Jesse's commanding officer was Capt. Samuel Pingree, later Governor of Vermont. Jesse was just under 18 years old when he enlisted, so his father was compelled to sign a written permission. As with so many young Civil War recruits, Jesse had never before traveled beyond the borders of his own State. He was sent first in May of 1861 to Camp Baxter, a union training camp located just outside St. Johnsbury, Vermont. There are a few Civil War letters of Jesse's remaining--precious momentoes of a young man who had high hopes but whose destiny was the ultimate sacrifice--to give his life to save the Union. His letters were kept by a bereaved mother, stored in a little tin box and passed down to her son George for safekeeping. They are now in the possession of Mrs. Gladys Adams of Hartland, Vt., and tell a story all their own.

Come along with us now as we relive the camp life of a young Vermont recruit in:

The Civil War Letters of Jesse Adams

Camp Baxter, 8 June, 1861
To: Father
From: Jesse A. Adams

Dear Father:

I now take my pen in hand to let you know I get along. I arrived here safe and sound. We had not gone more than five miles before there was a row started by a fellow by the name of Miles, a member of our company. It began in fun in the first place. Miles and Jim Welch got to sparing and Jim gave him the worst of it and he quit and pitched on to Dick Abbott and they were clipping away smartly when the Capt. stepped between them and Miles pitched on to Capt. Tom [Seaver] and there was some smart work for about a minute when the Capt. caught him by the throat and brought him into a seat in a great hurry. ... When Ayers our drill master came up and tried to quiet him, it could not be done. He [Miles] told Ayers to kiss his damned ass, but instead he hit him in the eye and it stilled him for a minute. When we got here he was put in the guard house. He has got the worst looking eye that I ever saw.

There is now two companies here and more are coming all of the time. There is two more a'comin today. When we got here last night, we filed out of the cars and marched to Camp Baxter which is ½ mile from town. We have got our blankets, but our uniforms have not come yet, but expect them soon. For supper we had potatoes and meat and coffee with sugar in it and wheat bread without butter. If I stop here a great while I shall be home and stay a spell. There was 12 of our men detailed as guard last night and I was one, so we don't have to drill this forenoon.

Please give my love to all inquiring friends.

Camp Baxter, 19 June, 1861
To: Sister Miriam Adams
From: Jesse A. Adams

Sister Miriam:

I now take my pen in hand to let you know I get along. I am well at this time as it will show. The companies are all in now. There is 900 men in all. I find a pencil better than a pen and ink to write with. I can take it on a book in my bunk. If you were to look in here now you would think it the 4th of July or some other big day! We are not allowed to go in and out of Camp Baxter without a pass from headquarters unless we are on guard then the guard can go outside but not to the village unless they have a pass in effect. We are living a little better. Now we have coffee with a little milk and sugar in it. Meat and some potatoes-- no butter. I should like to go south tomorrow if we had our guns. I guess I shall not go before July. If we do not, I shall come the first and stay 3 or 4 days and longer if I can. There were 10 of our company discharged by the inspector this morning on account of poor health. He did not like the looks of my throat and I guess if it had not been for Tom, I should have had to gone home. He said I might go as far as New York City and if the inspector there thought I am not right, I might come back, but I guess there will be no trouble.

Our company have all been vaccinated for small pox. Should be some sick, I suppose.

I buy my own butter and pies to eat at my own expense. I am going to send home and have the folks send up some good cheese and some cookies or something worth eating for baking. I would give $5.00 if you could come to Camp Baxter [to visit] from 5:00 until 8:00 p.m. Ten fifes blowing, eleven drums a drumming, and the regiment brass band all make more noise than you ever heard in your life! You said Mr. Chad got married. It is nothing more than I expected. All I have to say is success to the old goat.

I want Frank should write me. I shall not write Julia or Frank before next week. I was on guard last night. It seems almost like a dream as I think of such a war. The men that are here are pronounced by good Judges to he hard looking. Well I shall have to stop writing and go to guard.

Camp Baxter, 18 July, 1861
To: Joseph H. Adams
From: Jesse A. Adams

Brother Joe:

I rec'd your letter and I was glad to hear from you. I am stuffed as a bear. I enjoy myself first rate. We shall go next week, I think. I am going as a teamster. I have got my horses picked out and have harnessed them once. I have got four. They say I handle them well. There are as handsome horses as I could ask for. The leaders are daffle bay and the wheelers, brown. The four weight 4200 and 50. We shall not have our wagons and harnesses until we get to New York. We were inspected yesterday. They all took the oath. They all took the oath of allegiance but two. They were drummed out amid the groans and hissing of the Battalion. One had on no shoes.

I suppose Joe, you have begun haying in good earnest. I should like to be there to help you about two weeks, it would give you quite a start. I can't come home on account of my horses. We start a little before [the rest] of the regiment. I think if it is so you can, you must see this regiment before it leaves. If it is a good one as the Governor says, it is a model regiment. Some have nick-named it and call it the 'mauling regiment' on account of that scrape. Well Joe, I should have to stop and write a few words to mother, or she will have a conniption [sic].

Well Mother, I promised to write you and here goes. In the first place, I haven't much news to write for I have wrote it all to the rest. I guess there is not a man in the regiment who does not begrudge me my blanket. I lent it to one of our boys last night and it kept him as dry as a board. I think I shall buy me a rubber suit at New York. Before going with a team, I shall be more exposed to the storm. I shall want something so I can keep dry. I have got my picture type taken and shall send it to you before I leave. The boys have been quite steady since I got back. I shall write again before I go. That cheese and cookies went well. I have not eaten more than half of my sugar and cheese. Tom and his lady stopped at the St. Johnsbury House. Well, it is 3:00 and I shall have to go out and see to my horses. I got out and into camp when I please. ... I will close by bidding you goodbye.

Camp Baxter, 18 July, 1861
To: Miriam Adams
From: Jesse A. Adams

Sister Miriam:

I now take my pen in hand to let you know I got along. I am well at this time. I rec'd your letter and was glad to hear from you. I have been waiting some time knowing I could write when we should start, but I got sick of waiting and am going to write again. I have not wrote Julia, but I am going to this afternoon. I rec'd a letter from home last night. They have begun haying.

I have not drilled any since I came back. I am a goin' as wagoner as you already know. I have got four as handsome horses as I would wish for. ... I think we shall go on Tuesday. We were sworn in yesterday and had quite a time of it. I will give you a description of the way we were sworn into U.S. service. We were sworn in by Capt. Starr of Washington.

In the first place, he ordered the regiment to uncover their heads and hold up there right hands and then he repeated the oath. "I most solemnly swear to stand by these United States so Help me God," and the regiment repeated, "so help me God." After that he said all who had not repeated the oath step in front. Out went twelve men. Six of them had red hair--there was not one of our boys who went out. The officer in command said he wanted the cowards should come and stand in front of his company and he did so and all of the groaning and hissing I ever heard that beat all them. They gave them a minute to decide whether to go back or be drummed out of camp, and all but two went back. One was a Springfield boy--one a Burlington boy. They were taken to the guard house and their uniforms taken off and some old clothes put on to them and then they were put in between two lines of men and marched up and down between two files of men before the [entire] regiment three times. I should have rather of been shot then to have done it. One did not have on any shoes. They flung dirt at them and they kept step while the rogues marched. ... My love to you and love to the rest.

South Amboy, New Jersey, 29 July, 1861
To: Miriam Adams
From: Jesse A. Adams

Sister Miriam:

I now take my pen in hand to let you know how I got along. I am well and have been since I started. We wagoners had to wait one day after the regiment started. We started from St. Johnsbury Wednesday morning and stopped at the Falls [Bellows Falls] over night, and started from there at 6:00 a.m. We arrived at New Haven [Connecticut] at 9:00 p.m. and took the boat for New York at 5:00 a.m. I went into my bunk at 12:00 when we started from New Haven and when I awoke at 5:00 in the morning, the great city of New York was before my eyes!

It was a beautiful sight from the upper deck of the steam boat. I could command a good view of the harbor and as I thought a very few houses. There were all kinds of boats to see --from a common sail boat to the merchantmen and two men-of-war. The 69th and 9th New York Regiments came in while I was there. They was glad to get back. They looked rather hard, I can tell you, but said they would enlist again when they got rested. We stopped in New York from 5:00 p.m. to 2:00 a.m. I had a chance to see all of the misery I wanted too. You could see misery and wealth all at the same time. My chum Haden and me got into the horse cars and rode about two hours. We had a chance to see a good deal. There was a large fire on Broadway while we were there. It was burning when we left.

We took the boat from New York to South Amboy at 2:00 a.m. It was 30 miles from New York City. I have rode 100 miles on the boat and have not been sick a'might! We shall go the rest of the way by railroad. We take the cars at 3:00 tomorrow morning for Philadelphia and from there to Washington. We shall get there Tuesday night if we have good luck. I have had a good chance to look around since I started going on the freight cars and riding on top.

We have got our meals on the road since we started. There is 17 of us. We have plenty of fun, you can believe. ...From where I am writing, I can see ships and boats of all kinds and as there is some wind--, they ship 'round rather lively. I can tell you they have new potatoes and blackberries and cucumbers and all kinds of green stuff here now - - but I don't eat much trash, nor shant. Well Miriam, I shall have to close and write home now. I shall write again when I get to Washington. Direct your letters to Jesse Adams, Washington, 3 Regiment, Vermont, G Company in care of Capt. Seaver. Give my love to all my friends in Vermont.

South Amboy, New Jersey, 29 July, 1861
To: Samuel Harrison Adams
From: Jesse A. Adams

Dear Father:

I now take my pen to write to you a few lines to let you know where I am and how I am getting along. I am well and hearty.

Our regiment started Wednesday. ... [at New York City] I see all the misery and wealth I wanted to and more misery than wealth. First, I would have you know, there would be three or four little ragged imps digging away on my boots to make them shine and sometimes they would get quite wrathy, because he could not get the job. I stared out of New York with my boots shining like a 'nigger's heel'. There was a heavy fire on Broadway when we was there. I thought there was folks enough there before the fire but after the fire bells ring a few minutes, I found there had not been but a few. I never had any idea about New York City and did not suppose it was half as large as it is! Get on the upper deck of the ship and you can see all of the houses as far as you can, and then you have not seen half.

We had to lead our horses two miles right through the heart of the city. It was work you better guess for 17 men to lead 76 horses through there all in one bunch! We got very tired before we got through. Some of the boys blistered their hands and some got their feet trod on. If you don't believe it was a sweat job to lead them through there, you take 4 green high strung horses where it is still, and try it, and there we had to look out for drays, trucks, carriages and hacks and two or three men, women and children.

From here, they go by rail to Washington. We start tomorrow at 6:00 a.m. We shall get to Washington Tuesday night if we have good luck. Our regiment is there now. I don't know, but I think Old Scott will put us into active service for they say all through where they come that it is a bully old regiment. They [the men] get a good deal of praise and I hope when they come into action they will prove themselves worthy of it and I know they will. I think they will have a battle there this week and I shall be there and do my duty.

If I get killed, I shall think I have done my duty and I know you will think the same. And, if I live to return home at the end of three years, it will be said I was not afraid of my life when my Country was in danger and that's what everyone cannot say.

Well, I shall have to stop now. Tell mother I have got a piece of her cheese out here yet. Give my love to all of my friends and relatives. For you know, you and mother have a good deal of it. I have just wrote to Julia and Miriam. Send me some papers to read.

Camp Tyson, 23 Aug., 1861
To: Mrs. Salome Adams
From: Jesse A. Adams

Dear Mother:

I now take my pen in hand to write you a few lines. I am well and hearty. My work is not so hard but what I can sleep half of the time if I was a sleeping man, but you know I never could sleep in the day-time. So, of course, I have to find something else to do. I go to the city four times a week. I have got four as handsome horses as you ever saw on a team! I guess the headers are dapple bay and the wheel horses are chestnut. There has been four teamsters turned off since I came here because they did not know enough to drive four horses to the city and back without getting something smashed up. It has rained two days out of three and followed it the past 10 days. It is quite cool here at especially nights.

I should like to come home about once a week and get a look into your pantry, but I get along very well. I have to think of it once in awhile and that does me some good, you know. Is Miriam at home some? If she is, tell her to be sending a letter on here. I wrote to Julia yesterday. How is Mr. and Mrs. Crawford and Jimmy? Does Freed shoot my rifle any? If father thinks he can spare old Freed, I will come home another spring and have him come out and guard for me. He can have $16 a month from the U.S. and some good times and some that aren't so good. Thomas was going to write, but hasn't got time. He sends his love to you all, especially to you and Aunt Harriet [Harriet Seaver married Stillman Proctor]. Well, I shall have to stop writing and water my horses as it is most night, so goodbye. My love to all and you and father in particular.

Camp Tyson, 12 Sept., 1861
To: Joseph H. Adams
From: Jesse A. Adams

Brother Joe:

I now take my pen in hand to write you a few lines. I am well and so is Major Seaver [see Seaver family]. It has been a very busy place here for the last few days. Our men have moved across the river and have flung up batteries and fortifying against the imps as fast as possible. Our regiment and the 33rd NY. went out towards Fairfax yesterday and came very near getting into a scrape. They went out to survey and look the property over. They were not quite careful enough and the rebels got some cannon upon to a hill in the woods about ½ mile from them and went to shelling away at them. Our men were so near Fairfax, they knew it was folly to try to make a stand, so they had to retreat back while the rebels pounded down their shell and shot as well as they could. They fired one shell and it came in among the Wells River boys and killed 2 boys dead and wounded 6 more of them. The one that killed the boys come and struck Coleman, and as it struck, it burst, cutting him nearly in two, laying his innards all open. The wounds will recover.

At that, Captain Mott was ordered to open upon them with his artillery. The first shell he fired struck right under one of their guns and it flung it and the old cuss that rammed the balls, head over heels into the air and the next struck a man who was giving off orders. He was on a horse, he and his horse went to hell in a hurry. At that, they started quick time for Fairfax and our men came back. We shall have a fight before long that will count. There was one shell that came so close to the head of one of our boys, it took his cap off his head. You better believe he said if he could get his eye on to the old cuss that fired, that he would learn him some manners. The fellow was Mr. Demmon. Father will remember of seeing him at the Junction when we went to St. Johnsbury. He is a tuff nut.

We have some 200,000 men in Virginia now and a heap more [in other places]. There will be allot of blood shed before this thing is settled. I think my life shall be freely given, if it is my lot, for those Devils must be whipped. Any one who is afraid of a few pounds of lead in such a time as this, has not got any of the blood of our fore-fathers in him. When they shed their blood, they shed it for freedom and a government and they got both and delivered them in our hands for safe keeping and we will do it or die in the cause. Well Joe, I must stop and go to sleep, for it is getting late. Tom and I are well, we send our love to all. Good night, write soon.

Camp Advance/Smith, -- Oct., 1861
To: Miriam Adams
From: Jesse Adams

Sister Miriam:

I now take my pen in hand to write you a few lines. I have not rec'd a letter from you for so long, I hardly think I should know you. Hard writing but if you will send one along, I will try and read it through. You must be so old--you had better write. I am as tough as a man need to be. I have to work quite hard some of the time and sometimes I don't have anything to do for two or three days. When Seaver got here, he looked quite tough. We have got some big guns and there is not much going on here now.

The other companies have come in here with us so to make 2, 034, and five are not more than 100 years from one another. The 4th and 5th are very good working set of soldiers. They are drilling and learning something of a soldier's duty every day. They will learn more out here in one month than they could drilling in one year here. They had a chance to see how much more a regiment counts that is well drilled than one that is half drilled.

We took caissons to Falls Church and then gave up and we retreated back to Baily Cross Roads. Our men made a slight mistake when they took them as the right was fighting rebels when they was [also] firing into our own men who was there. Thought the sick rebels were coming and they had quite a fight. There were 7 killed and 60 men wounded. I shouldn't wonder if we had a fight in 48 hours and we may not for a month. Our pickets and the rebels are only two miles apart and [we] sometimes scrap.

I had a letter from the folks yesterday. They are all well and said they had a good journey to G. It is quite warm out here now. Well Miriam, I shall have to close by bidding you to write soon. Give my love to all. This from your brother in haste.

Camp Griffin, Virginia, 6 Oct., 1861 [Wednesday]
To: Samuel Harrison Adams
From: Joseph H. Adams

Dear Father:

I now take my pen in hand to write to you. Jesse was very crazy all day yesterday, but the Doctor gave him some sleeping powders last night and he slept most of the night. He is very sleepy today. He does not move around as he did yesterday. He does not notice anyone. Sometimes I think he knows me for an instant when I first rouse him, but can't tell for certain. The doctor had just give him some pills last night and they operated well, I should think. He does not know when he wants to use the pot and so you may guess, it is a job to keep him clean. If I was not here, he might lay in the filth for hours before they would notice it. I have done the best I could by him and so have the others.

Camp Griffin, Virginia, 7 Oct., 1861 [Thursday]
To: Miriam Adams
From: Joseph H. Adams

Dear Sister Miriam:

Jesse is wild yet, but he continues to look better and he takes more notice of things. Do not think he knows me.

His pulse runs quite high but it does not wear him down so fast as one might suppose. They think he stands it first rate. I was rather down when I wrote [to father]. He was so bad but I think if I can keep him from catching cold in this place, he will get better before many days. I feel some tired and have not had much sleep for three or four days. They do not pay so much attention to keeping him covered up as I do. Tell father to find out whether they can get rid of paying me for what time I have been posted here not. They haven't paid me yet.

They want me to go to teaming here... If I did, I should have to take some run-down team and that I don't want to do. That box of shirts was not at Washington, and I don't know as it ever will be. As soon as Jesse is well enough to leave him, I shall go and see what I can do about it.

Camp Griffin, Virginia, 18 Oct., 1861
To: Miriam Adams
From: Jesse Adams

Sister Miriam:

I now take my pen in hand to write you a few lines. I am well as may judge for I will tell you my exact weight is 170 pounds. I have not been sick in bed. I eat like a horse since I came here. I think it would be a poor sport for anyone to be sick here, but if I am sick, I shall do the best I can. I suppose Miriam, up there in Vt. they think this war is progressing rather slow, and if they do, they think us never right as they can. But I can tell you one thing we are waiting for, and that is for Banks to get along a little further. He made a small strike yesterday and captured one 32 pounder and knocked over 160 rebels. We are out most to Virginia. We shall be there this week I think. The rebels have fell back as far as Fairfax Court House which is five miles from Vienna. I don't think they meant to fight much until they get to Manassas. ..Banks is marching along toward there with his Army and so we are under McClellan and we will come in there. [It's about].. a hike and I will bet we will bring shell and horses enough so they can shoot one piece and more if they want too. General Seaver is going home before long. [The Army] don't pay him but $12.00 a month, and I guess he things he won't enlist for fear he could not be on the right side of a ball and shells and they would get the wrong side of him. I don't pretend to say I know it is so, but I reckon it is, or he would stay. Well Miriam, have got to stop writing as I have no more news to write in particular. I have not rec'd a letter from you or Julia for a long time. Write soon, give my love to all who want it.

Camp Griffin, Virginia, 28 Oct., 1861 [Friday]
To: Samuel H. Adams
From: Joseph H. Adams

Dear Father:

I commenced a letter to Mother yesterday, but will write to you now. We all thought Jesse was better and would get along yesterday forenoon and so I wrote to Mother. About the middle of the afternoon, he began to choke and his stomach seems full so that he cannot breathe. He has failed very fast all night. The doctor thought he could not live until morning. He may hold out several days, and may not many hours.

The chances are all against him, he's in a drowse most of the time. Hope until there is no hope. Comfort poor Mother all you can and all the rest. I shall put another letter in tomorrow morning. I hope there will something turn up so he will be better. If he dies, I shall bring him home. My love to Mother, Sisters, and all the rest. I must close now. He does not choke and seems filled up all the time, but cannot swallow anything without strangling him very much.

Camp Griffin, Virginia, 25 Nov., 1861
To: Joseph H. Adams
From: Daniel C. Wilson

Friend Adams:

I am well. I have got fatted up so that you would not know me now. Things go on just the same as when you were here. All the boys are pretty healthy now. One of the boys died since you left us, his name was Hiram Shambear. I have no news to write. Enclosed I send you $1.00, which I collected of Mr. Bixby. Mr. Judd refused to pay the money to me. All the reason he gave was that he didn't like the plan of paying it to a stranger. I promised to take the money and give him a receipt, but he said that he would send it himself. Then he should know that it was paid. I told him that I though he acted as though he did not mean to pay you. I spoke to Capt. Pingree about it and he went to Capt Harrington and told him how the fellow acted and Capt. Harrington said he would make him send it to you damned quick.

So I want you should write and let me know if he don't sent it to you right off. I'll hound him until he pays it. He expects to get rid of paying you because you are so far off. Judd said that you never had spoken to him anything about his paying the money to me. Write soon and tell me the news.

Camp Griffin, Virginia, 9 Feb., 1862
To: Joseph H. Adams
From: Samuel S. Robinson

Friend Joseph:

I have taken my pen in hand to write you a few lines and let you know that I have not forgotten you. I have not gone to Vermont yet, nor I don't know when I shall be. My health is not any better. I have given up my gun and I don't answer a roll call. I don't do anything, now at all. Friend Dan is a'goin to write to you and I am a 'goin to put my letter into his. My health feels so bad that you must not expect a very long letter from me this time. But if I don't get well enough to come home, I will write a longer letter to you. And when I come home, I will try and make you a call. I don't know as you can read my writing it is so poor, but please excuse all mistakes and poor writing. So good bye for this time from your friend.

Camp Griffin, Virginia, 9 Feb., 1862
To: Joseph H. Adams
From: Daniel C. Wilson

Friend Joseph:

I am well as ever. I rec'd a letter from you last night and was very glad to hear from you. I should like first rate to see you today. I think of you every day and think of Jesse no less than ever. Jesse and I were always great friends and were together a great deal of the time. Perhaps it's all for the best that we should be separated here, though we can't see it now.

About the tents. We have got some new tents and they are good ones. We are more comfortable than we were when you were here. The boys are all well as a general thing. Daniel Hadley is very sick now in the hospital. It is expected that he can't live long. Capt. Pingree is well and so is Lt. [Edward A.] Chandler. Philip Thomas is our 2nd Lieut. We have fires in our tents. The mud is so deep that we can't stir, scarcely, that is all that hinders our advancing.

We think that the rebels are very nearly whipped. All that we want now is a general engagement-- [and] that we shall have as soon as we can move on. I was not at the Battle of Drainsville. Our right did not get onto the field till after the battle was over. Drainsville is a small pace, lying about 8 miles to the southwest of us. There is no snow here, has been one of consequence. Picketing is the hardest work that we have to do now. I think that if I live, I shall see home by next July, without any doubt.

Samuel Robinson is still here. I will ask him to write a few lines with me. I have tried to draw the money to pay you instead of having Judd draw it, but have learned it can be drawn by noone except him. I am sorry that it is so, for I meant to have drawn it and send it t you in this. He has turned out to be a devil and there's no remedy for it except to thrash him. Mr. Albert Judd is the miserable wretches' name.

Camp Griffin, 10 March, 1862
To: Samuel Harrison Adams
From: Daniel C. Wilson

Dear Friend:

I rec'd your kind letter a day or two since and deemed it worthy of an answer. I am well and in fine spirits. I have not much news to write, but will answer the few questions which you asked in your letter. You asked me if Jesse always appeared to be contented. He did and very much so as long as he had his senses. I was with him every day, long as the doctor allowed visitors to go in and see him. He was sick but a short time and a few of the last days he was wandering and took no notice of objects around him. I think that his suffering was not great while sick.

Your noble son Jesse can never be forgotten in this regiment. There is not another man in the regiment that I should miss half as much. I was always looking forward to the time when we should both be discharged from the service. He used to say to me, "Old boy, when we get discharged, you've got to go home with me." I thought just as much of him as of a brother, and think of him now as one who has laid down his life for his country. He will be remembered by all who know him. I look at him today as better off than I am.

Samuel Robinson has gone to a hospital in Philadelphia. He has written once since he has been there. The hospital where he is now is the United States Hospital, 5th Street, Philadelphia, PA.

I feel grateful for the kind offer to send me something, but there is a great deal of trouble in getting things here which are sent to us. On account of getting miscarried or opened on the way and then I don't expect to stay in Virginia more than two or three months longer and I shall try to get along if as though I had got to stay here all my life.

There has been one death in our company lately. His name was Ransons Parker. I think that your son Joseph will remember him. He was one of the recruits. Daniel Hadley was very sick when I wrote last, but he is now nearly well.

We have got along here this winter very comfortable so far, we've had no snow here to speak of, but a'plenty of mud. I will close now, thinking that I have written quite a lengthy letter.

--- The End ---

[Taken from Familes of Cavendish, Vol. 1, by Linda M. Welch, Cavendish Historical Society, Cavendish, Vermont, 1994, and reprinted with permission for the Vermont Civil War Web Page on the World Wide Web]

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