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Phillips, Walter Arnold

MILITARY SERVICE

Age: 20, credited to Calais, VT
Unit(s): 2nd VT INF, 13th VT INF, 3rd VT LARTY
Service: comn 1LT, Co. F, 2nd VT INF, 5/20/61 (5/20/61), dismissed the service 12/31/61 by sentence of GCM; enl 8/19/62, m/i 10/10/62, 1SGT, Co. H, 13th VT INF, comn 2LT, 6/4/63 (6/12/63), m/o 7/21/63; comn 2LT, 3rd VT LARTY BTRY, 12/12/63 (1/13/64), pr 1LT, 1/2/64 (1/13/64), disch 2/13/65, SOWD (medical reasons) [College: NU 62]

See Legend for expansion of abbreviations

VITALS

Birth: 07/1842, Burlington, VT
Death: 02/05/1901

Burial: Rosehill Cemetery, Chicago, IL
Marker/Plot: Not recorded
Gravestone researcher/photographer:
Findagrave Memorial #: 17065954

MORE INFORMATION

Alias?: None noted
Pension?: Yes, 11/17/1881, VT; widow Isabelle, 2/13/1901, IL
Portrait?: Gibson Collection, VHS Collections, 13th History
College?: NU 62
Veterans Home?: Not Found
(If there are state digraphs above, this soldier spent some time in a state or national soldiers' home in that state after the war)

Remarks: more off-site

DESCENDANTS

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BURIAL:

Copyright notice

Rosehill Cemetery, Chicago, IL

Check the cemetery for location/directions and other veterans who may be buried there.


Photo

VHS - Reunion Society Collection

Photo Photo

John Gibson Collection

Photo

(Sturtevant's Pictorial History
Thirteenth Regiment
Vermont Volunteers
War of 1861-1865
)

Biography

SERGEANT WALTER A. PHILLIPS volunteered from the town of Calais, August, 1862, and joined Company H, and at its organization was appointed 1st Sergeant, and when a vacancy occurred in his company was commissioned and promoted to Second Lieutenant in Company H. This was a very proper recognition for a young man only 20, and was evidence of excellent qualifications and merit. Indeed he was a model young man and had been well brought up and stood high with the officers of Company H, and was deservedly popular in his company. He acquitted himself wtih credit on all occasions. Was in fact one of the most enthusiastic and energetic of Company H. Was ready for duty and willing to respond no matter how arduous the task or serious the matter. His disposition was kind and generous, endeavoring to make his associates happy and buoyant and to prepare them for battle which he believed was certain before our term as a regiment expired. He did much on the seven days' march to Gettysburg to keep the boys cheered up and remain in the ranks ready for the impending battle. No doubt it can be truthfully affirmed that among so many valiant young officers of the 13th Regiment, not one made a better record in the Gettysburg campaign and fight than Lieutenant Phillips. He was mustered out with the regiment July 21st, 1863, and returned to his home proud that it had been his privilege to serve his country in time of greatest need and in the 13th Regiment. Lieutenant Phillips though much attached to his native state and loved the hills, valleys and streams of boyhood days, went into the great west and settled in Chicago, 111., where he died February 5th, 1901, and there he is buried. (His picture will be seen on page 318.)

Source: Sturtevant, p. 655