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Long, Job

MILITARY SERVICE

Age: 22, credited to Brattleboro, VT
Unit(s): 11th MA INF
Service: enl 6/13/61, m/i, Pvt, Co. D, 11th MA INF, 6/13/61, m/o 6/24/64, Boston, MA

See Legend for expansion of abbreviations

VITALS

Birth: 08/19/1838, County Kerry, Ireland
Death: 05/16/1919

Burial: St. Michaels Cemetery, Brattleboro, VT
Marker/Plot: Not recorded
Gravestone researcher/photographer: Tom Boudreau
Findagrave Memorial #: 10316578

MORE INFORMATION

Alias?: None noted
Pension?: Unknown
Portrait?: Unknown
College?: Not Found
Veterans Home?: Not Found
(If there are state digraphs above, this soldier spent some time in a state or national soldiers' home in that state after the war)

Remarks: None

DESCENDANTS

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BURIAL:

Copyright notice

Tombstone

St. Michaels Cemetery, Brattleboro, VT

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Biography

Headlines

Job Long is one of those who had trouble in enlisting, but stuck to it until he was accepted in a Massachusetts regiment and saw three years of active service. Bull Run was the first big engagement in which he took part. Mr. Long was asked if he was one of those who ran away there and promptly replied: "I was, and those who didn't are there yet."

Job Long was born, Aug. 19, 1838, in Belnahaue, parish of Danquin, near Dingle, County Kerry, Ireland, a son of John and Katherine (Garvey) Long. His mother had brothers were were employed in responsible positions on railroad construction work near Brattleboro and came to this country leaving her four children with their father in the old country. In January, 1850, she sent for them and they came direct to Brattleboro. With the exception of a few months in Springfield, Mo., and in Chicago, Mr. Long has since been a resident of Brattleboro.

He attended school here and his first employment was with Lieut. T. P. Greene, afterwards Commodore Greene, of Brattleboro, in a general capacity about the house. Later he worked as a boy in several places and when the war broke out was employed in the machine shop of Hines & Newman. This concern had a large shipment of paper mill machinery on cars ready to ship to South Carolina, when news of the firing on Fort Sumter was received. The shipment was promptly unloaded, and as most of the concern was with southern companies the plant was shut down.

Mr. Long first applied for enlistment in Company C, 2d Vermont. He was rejected with the explanation that he was too short to pass the requirement. He heard of a chum who was shorter than he was who had enlisted in Company D, 11th Massachusetts regiment, and he traveled to Boston, where he was promptly accepted. Massachusetts was not so fussy as Vermont at that time. Two hours after his arrival at Fort Warren to enlist he had on his regimentals and was being instructed in the school of the soldier. The regiment was mustered in at Fort Warren July 13, 1861, and spent two weeks in camp in North Cambridge.

Their first camp was in the rear of the White House at Washington an then they went to Alexandria. In the battle of Bull Run the regiment was in support of the famous New York Zouaes. After the battle the regiment was brigaded with the 2d New Hampshire, the 1t Massachusetts and the 26th Pennsylvania. The brigade spent the winter at Budds Ferry, Md., and in the spring of 1862 was taken by schooner to Hampton Roads, where their vessel anchored close to the Monitor hat had just been victorious in the first battle in history between iron-clads.

The regiment participated in the battles of Fair Oaks, Savage Station, Glendale, Malvern Hill, Bristol Station, 2d Bull Run, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Locust Grove, Mine Run, Wilderness and Cold Harbor, and through all these engagements, several of them among the most severe of the entire war, Mr. Long came unscathed.

At Gettysburg his regiment was in front of the Rogers road under General Sickles. On the second day of that battle a brigade of Mississippi troops charged them and was repulsed. Last summer when Mr. Long was at the Gettysburg reunion the members of his brigade invited two representatives from each of the Confederate regiments that charged them to be their guests.

Mr. Long, in conversation with one of their guests, remarked that they were standing on the spot where he stood at the time of the charge by the Mississippi regiments. His companion reached up to his left shoulder and carefully felt of an old wound, wondering whether Mr. Long was the man who had put him out of commission as a soldier, for, he said, he had nearly reached that spot when hit in the shoulder.

Mr. Long was mustered out of the service on Boston common June 24, 164, and came back to Brattleboro. His brother, James, was a lieutenant in the 46th Mo., to take charge of his place until he returned from the war. Mr. Long did so and soon after arriving there the town was fearful of attempted capture from General Sterling Pierce, who was raiding in that vicinity,, and every able-bodied man was put to work digging rifle pits and otherwise preparing to resist the rebel raider should he appear. Mr. Long says he dd not appreciate that work after having spent three years in hard marching and fighting.

He remained in Springfield six months and returned to Brattleboro where he entered the employ of the Estey Organ company In 1869 he moved to Springfield, MO., but remained there only a few months and then went to Chicago, where he worked 14 months in the Burdett organ shops, but returned to Brattleboro and re-entered the employ of the Esteys, continuing there 25 years as fireman, foreman of the filling department and as a finisher. Failing eyesight forced him to abandon active employment about 12 years ago. Two years ago he had a cataract removed from one eye and now another is forming. Otherwise Mr. Long is in the best of health.

He married, May 25, 1866, in St. Michael's Roman Catholic church, Miss Mary Hannifan of Lowell, Mass. They had nine children, seven of whom are living. They are John F., employed at Estey's; Job A., with the Hooker, Corser & Mitchell Co.; Thomas a plumber with W. J. Penland; Charles, who is also a resident of Brattleboro; Miss Margaret H., housekeeper for Job A.; Mrs. Mary McDonald, who lives with Mr. Long; and Miss Katherine Agnes, who keeps house for her father. Mrs. Long died Aug. 3, 1912.

Mr. Long is a member of St. Michael's Roman Catholic church and of Seddgwick post, having joined the post in 1871.

The Brattleboro Daily Reformer, August 1, 1914.

Courtesy of Gail Lynde.

Obituary

Death of Job Long. Veteran of Civil War and Well Known Resident of the Town - Formerly With Esteys 25 Years.

Job Long, 80, one of the town's best known Irish citizens, died Friday morning at 4:15 o'clock in his home on Cedar street of a complication of diseases. He had been confined to his home nearly all the time since last November, but had been ill in bed only one day.

Mr. Long was born in Benahaue, County Kerry, Ireland, Aug. 19, 1838, and was a son of John and Katherine (Garvey) Long. His mother had brothers who were employed in Responsible positions on railroad construction work near Brattleboro and came to this country, leaving her four children with their father in the old country. In January, 1850, she sent for them and they came direct to Brattleboro. Mr. Long had since made his home here with the exception of a few months spent in Springfield, Mo., and Chicago.

He married, May 25, 1866, in St. Michael's Roman Catholic church, Miss Mary Hannifan of Lowell, Mass. They had nine children, seven of whom are living. They are Mrs. Mary MacDonald, John F., Job A., Thomas E., Charles, Miss Margaret H. and Miss Katherine Long, all of Brattleboro. Mrs. Long died Aug. 3, 1912.

Mr. Long also leaves one sister, Mrs. Mary Stewart, and one brother, Thomas Long, both of this town, nine grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

Mr. Long attended school in Brattleboro and his first employment was with Lieut. T.P. Greene, afterwards Commodore Greene, in a general capacity about the house. Later he worked as a boy in several places and when the war broke out he was employed in the machine shop of Hines & Newman. He first applied for enlistment in Company C, 2d Vermont regiment. He was rejected with the explanation that he was too short to pass the requirements. He then applied in Massachusetts and was accepted and placed in Company D, 11th Massachusetts regiment.

The regiment was mustered in at Fort Warren July 13, 1861. Mr. Long was in all the important engagements which the regiment passed through, but was not wounded. He was mustered out on Boston common June 24, 1864, and went to Springfield, Mo.

He remained in Springfield six months and returned to Brattleboro, where he entered the employ of the Estey Organ Co. In 1869 he moved to Springfield, Mo., but remained only a few months and then went to Chicago, where he worked 14 months in the Burdett organ shops, but returned to Brattleboro and re-entered the employ of the Esteys, continuing there 25 years as fireman, foreman of the filling department and as a finisher. Failing sight forced him to give up active employment about 17 years ago.

Mr. Long was greatly interested in all Grand Army affairs and attended the re-unions when possible. When able he always participated in the Memorial day services here. He attended the reunion of his brigade at Gettysburg in 1913. He was a congenial and companionable man, jovial in spite of his failing sight, and had many friends. Some years ago he visited his native country, but the attractions there were not be compared with those of the United States, in his estimation. He was a member of St. Michael's Roman Catholic church and had been a member of the Sedgwick post, G.A.R., since 1871.

The funeral was held Monday at 9 in the Roman Catholic church. Rev. James P. Rand officiated. Mr. Long's four sons, Job A., John F. , Thomas E. and Charles W. Long, acted as bearers. A delegation of six from Sedgwick post, G.A.R., of which Mr. Long was a member, acted as escort to the body from the church to Main street bridge. The burial took place in the family lot in the Roman Catholic cemetery.

Source: Vermont Phoenix, 24 May 1919:

Compliments of Suzanne Walker.

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