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Individual Record
Quinn, John Paul
MILITARY SERVICE
Age: 0, credited to Vermont
Unit(s): USN
Service: ASURG, USN, 5/61; gunboat Sebago, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 62-63; Naval Hospital, Norfolk, 63; Steam frigate, Minnesota, flag-ship, North Atlantic blockading Squadron, 64; SURG, 12/64, steamer Frolic, European Squadron, 64; sloop of war Saratoga, 69; d/svc, Havana, Cuba, 6/6/89

See Legend for expansion of abbreviations

VITALS
Birth: 07/07/1838, Vermont
Death: 06/06/1869

Burial: , Havana , Cuba
Marker/Plot: Not recorded
Gravestone researcher/photographer:

Findagrave Memorial #: 0
(There may be a Findagrave Memorial, but we have not recorded it)
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Alias?: None noted
Pension?: Unknown
Portrait?: Unknown
College?: Not Found
Veterans Home?: Not Found
(State digraphs will show that this soldier spent some time in a state or national soldier's home)

Remarks: None
DESCENDANTS

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BURIAL:
Copyright notice
Died in Havana, Cuba
Check the cemetery for location/directions
and other veterans who may be buried there.



John Paul Quinn

John Paul Quinn was born 7 July 1838, in Vermont. He was appointed Assistant Surgeon on 9 May 1861 from Michigan. He was initially assigned to the frigate St. Lawrence, in Norfolk. He served on the side-wheel steamer Sebago in 1862, at the naval hospital at New York, in 1863. He was promoted to Passed Assistant Surgeon on 26 October 1863. In 1864, he reported to the screw frigate Minnesota, where he was appointed Surgeon on 30 December 1864. He detached in February 1865, and served with the North Atlantic Squadron for six months.

Quinn was on board Saratoga on 21 April 1869, when she left New York. The vessel arrived in Havana, Cuba, on 10 May. On 5 June Quinn came down with yellow fever. He suffered "partial suppression of urine; convulsions; coma; no black-vomit" for five days before he died; interment possibly in Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia (his widow is buried there, Section G Lot 168). Quinn was replaced on Saratoga by Passed Assistant Surgeon Lewis S. Pilcher, from the screw steamer Penobscot, which was also in Havana harbor, who documented the epidemic on Saratoga. Another Vermonter onboard Saratoga, Lieutenant George N. Flagg (q.v.), also succumbed to the disease.

Quinn married, in 1864, Emily Penn-Gaskell. She died 17 February 1869. His son, Granville Penn Quinn, born 5 January 1868, was raised by Mary Penn-Gaskell Coates, Emily's sister, who acted as guardian for him until her death in 1877. He received a minor's pension from 6 June 1869, until he turned 16 on 4 January 1884.

Extract from "Green Mountain Mariners in the Civil War," to be published Fall 2011, by Tom Ledoux.