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Jaquith, William H.

MILITARY SERVICE

Age: 23, credited to Weston, VT
Unit(s): 21st WI INF
Service: enl, Waupaca, WI, 8/12/62, CPL, Co. G, 21st WI INF, 8/12/62, m/o 6/8/65, Washington, DC

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VITALS

Birth: 04/01/1839, Mount Holly, VT
Death: 02/10/1914

Burial: Maple Grove Cemetery, Weston, VT
Marker/Plot: Not recorded
Gravestone researcher/photographer: Jennifer Snoots
Findagrave Memorial #: 100092160

MORE INFORMATION

Alias?: None noted
Pension?: Unknown
Portrait?: Unknown
College?: Not Found
Veterans Home?: Not Found
(If there are state digraphs above, this soldier spent some time in a state or national soldiers' home in that state after the war)

Remarks: Died at Brattleboro Retreat

DESCENDANTS

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BURIAL:

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Tombstone

Maple Grove Cemetery, Weston, VT

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Obituary

William Jaquith of Weston, who died Feb. 10 in the Brattleboro retreat, was a man who, until his health failed, bodily and mentally, through hard work and reserves, was most ingenious and enterprising. It was he who was the inventor of the lumberman's hollow back saw, which is almost universally used now, and he also invented a machine for finishing chair stock. For many years he was selectman at Weston and it was during that period that he began a "good Roads" movement in that town, purchasing the first road machine the town ever saw and with it making the Ludlow mountain road, which was up to that time almost impassable, a smooth turnpike road, without a waterbar, by using a stonepuller and gunpowder to get out the rocks and the road machine to finish the road. The town, however, refused to pay for the machine until it had paid for the use of it a number of years. Mr. Jaquith was a veteran of the Civil war and was 74 years old at the time of his death. He had been at the retreat for treatment most of the time for the past twelve years.

Source: Barre Times, Feb. 21, 1914
Courtesy of Tom Boudreau.



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