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Dolph, Leonard

MILITARY SERVICE

Age: 0, credited to Unknown
Unit(s): 118th NY INF
Service: Enl, Crown Point, 7/29/62, m/i, Pvt, Co. E, 118th NY INF, 8/30/62, dis/dsb 11/16/63, US Genl Hosp., Hampton, VA

See Legend for expansion of abbreviations

VITALS

Birth: 08/23/1805, Crown Point, NY
Death: 01/09/1908

Burial: Pine Hill Cemetery, Brandon, VT
Marker/Plot: Not recorded
Gravestone researcher/photographer: Heidi McColgan

Findagrave Memorial #: 0
(There may be a Findagrave Memorial, but we have not recorded it)

MORE INFORMATION

Alias?: None noted
Pension?: Yes, death date/location
Portrait?: Unknown
College?: Not Found
Veterans Home?: Not Found
(If there are state digraphs above, this soldier spent some time in a state or national soldiers' home in that state after the war)

Remarks: None

DESCENDANTS

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BURIAL:

Copyright notice

Tombstone

Tombstone

Pine Hill Cemetery, Brandon, VT

Check the cemetery for location/directions and other veterans who may be buried there.




Leonard Dolph

St. Albans Daily Messenger, Tuesday, March 19, 1907

OLDEST CIVIL WAR VETERAN.

The Rev. Leonard Dolph, of Brandon,
101 Years, Old Holds the Honor.

(Special to The Messenger.)

Rutland, March 19. - The sketch of Joseph St. Peter, of this city, aged 95 years recently published and giving Mr. St. Peter the credit of being the oldest Civil War veteran in Vermont, has brought to light the fact that there is a still older one in the person of the Rev. Leonard Dolph, of Brandon, who is 101 years old. Mr. Dolph is a retired Methodist minister having ceased active work In 1867, after-over fifty years of service. Although 58 years old he left his pulpit when the Civil War broke out and enlisted in Company E, 118th New York Infantry, serving as chaplain until discharged December 18, 1863, because of illness. He was at the siege of Suffolk, Va., battle of Franklin, Va., and battle of Gloucester Courthouse, Va.

Mr. Dolph is a member of Ormsbee Post, G. A. R., of Brandon, and, at the time of his 100th birthday a celebration was held under the direction of the post. The centenarian replying In a firm voice to a speech of congratulation by ex-Gov. E. J. Ormsbee.

Mr. Dolph is still in good health. He is able to walk out every day and entertains many callers especially his G. A. R. friends. He enjoys a good cigar and is able to discuss current topics of the day and especially theology, as well as many younger men.

Mr. Dolph was born at Crown Point N.Y., August 23, 1805. His parents Mr. and Mrs. Simeon Dolph, traced their lineage back to Baltaajzar DeWolf who came to America with the New Haven colony and settled at what is now Middletown, Conn. The name was later Americanized to Dolph. The grandfather of Mr. Dolph was killed in the battle of Louisburg in 1757, in the French and Indian War. Mr. Dolph was ordained a Methodist minister in 1836. He had no theological training, in his day ministers preaching the gospel and getting their education as they went along. He belonged to the Champlain conference and preached mostly in New York slate, including Crown Point, Moriah, Newcomb, and Long Lake; also Cornwall, Vt. He was married in 1825 to Miss Maria Taylor, who died in 1840. Three years later he married Mary J. Aimes, He was the father of seventeen children. His oldest son is 75years old. Mr. Dolph has voted for every president since John Quincy Adams.

St. Albans Messenger, Thursday, January 16, 1908

CENTENARIAN DEAD.

Rev. Leonard Dolph, of Brandon, Was 102 Years Old.

Brandon, Jan.9, -- The Rev. Leonard Dolph, aged 102, years, a retired minister and an old soldier, died this morning at his home here. The funeral will be held Sunday.

Leonard Dolph was born at Crown Point, N.Y. August 23, 1805, the only son in a family of three. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Simeon Dolph, traced their lineage directly back t Baltahazor DeWolf and Alice, his wife, who came to America with the New Haven colony and settled near what is now known as Middletown, Conn. In the succeeding generations the name was Americanized to Dolph. Mr Dolph's father was a carpenter and while constructing a building at Montreal fractured a leg that resulted in the death In his thirty-third year. His grandfather, Joseph, was killed at the age of 40 at the battle of Louisburg in 1757, in the French and Indian War. In fact, none of his ancestors lived to a remarkable age.

Mr. Dolph was ordained a Methodist minister in 1836 and continued in active service up to December 4, 1887. A period of over half a century in the pulpit.

He was married in 1825 to Maria Taylor, who bore him ten children, among whom are living John, of Iowa, Angelina, of Vermont, Maranda, of Iowa, Fanny, of New York, Sarah, of Massachusetts. His first wife died in 1840 and three years later he married Mary J. Aimes, to whom were born seven children. Maria, of Vermont, George, of Oregon, Luther, of Pennsylvania and Jennie, of Vermont, are now living. The death of his second wife occurred about five years ago.

At the outbreak of the Civil War, though 58 years old, he left the pulpit and enlisted as private in Company E, 118th N.Y. Jnf., in which regiment he served as chaplain, without appointment until discharged. He was at the siege of Suffolk, Va., April 20 May 4, 1963; battle of Franklin, Va., June 16, 1863; Gloucester Court House, Va., July 25, 1863. He was taken ill at Baltimore and received honorable discharge, December 18, 1863, because of disability. He was a member of C.J. Ormsbee Post, G. A. R. of Brandon.

Mr. Dolph was a. strong Republican and cast his vote for that party's nominee since the formation of that party in 1856. His first vote was cast for J.Q. Adams, sixth president of the United States, in 1828. The greater part of his life work was accomplished near the shores of Lake Champlain.

Among his parishes were Crown Point, Moriah, Newcomb, and Long Lake, N.Y., and Cornwall.

At the time of Mr. Dolph's 100th birthday a celebration was held under the direction of the local G. A. R. post and the centenarian replied in a firm voice to a speech of congratulation by ex-Gov. E. J. Ormsbee.

Contributed by Bob Hackett



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