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14th Vermont Infantry
Timeline
1862/01/20Sgt Charles E. Abell, Co. H, 5th VVI, was discharged for disability; six months later, he would be commissioned Capt., Co. D, 14th VVI (5th Infantry)
1862/10/2114th Regiment organized at Brattleboro October 21, 1862, for nine months. (Dyer)
1862/10/2214th Regiment traveled to Washington, October 22-25. (Dyer)
1862/10/2514th Regiment was at Camp Chase, Arlington, Virginia, October 25-28 (Dyer)
1862/11/2614th Regiment was on picket duty near Occoquan Creek November 26-December 5. (Dyer)
1863/01/2014th and 16th Regiments were at Fairfax Station January 20 through March 24. (Dyer)
1863/02/16J. C. Williams, 14th Regiment, wrote: "The troops in this vicinity are still on the move to the front." (more)
1863/02/18CPL Alonzo E. Root, Co. I, 14th Vt. Inf., died of disease; he was buried in Barber Cemetery, Charlotte (Cemetery database)
1863/02/19J. C. Williams, 14th Regiment, wrote: "Not much drilling for the past few days, in consequence of the bad state of the weather." (more)
1863/02/20J. C. Williams, 14th Regiment, wrote: "Another pleasant day, and the mud is drying up." (more)
1863/02/24J. C. Williams, 14th Regiment, wrote: "Very dull in camp to-day, winter in earnest. The ground has been covered with snow for several days." (more)
1863/02/26J. C. Williams, 14th Regiment, wrote: "Our camp is seeming quite dreary at present. The snow has fallen to the depth of a foot." (more)
1863/02/28J. C. Williams, 14th Regiment, wrote: "Have again received a box of luxuries from home, and fear that I shall have to report to the surgeon in the morning." (more)
1863/03/01J. C. Williams, 14th Regiment, wrote: "Dull in camp to-day, army still inactive, and hope that a movement somewhere will soon be effected to dispel the gloom which is hanging like a pall over our country." (more)
1863/03/05J. C. Williams, 14th Regiment, wrote: "Drilling this week six hours each day." (more)
1863/03/06J. C. Williams, 14th Regiment, wrote: "A rumor is afloat that old Stuart is again in this vicinity, and marching orders have been received." (more)
1863/03/07J. C. Williams, 14th Regiment, wrote: "The orders of yesterday have been countermanded, and news has come that the programme is changed, and instead of an advance movement by Stuart, he has retreated across the Rappahannock with his whole force." (more)
1863/03/08J. C. Williams, 14th Regiment, wrote: More wet weather, which makes it so muddy that there is no drilling." (more)
1863/03/09J. C. Williams, 14th Regiment, wrote: "Important news this morning. Another raid by Mosby last night, and the capture of our Brigadier, Gen. E. H. Stoughton, at Fairfax Court House, five miles from his brigade." (more)
1863/03/10J. C. Williams, 14th Regiment, wrote: "The cavalry sent in pursuit of the guerrilla party have returned without overtaking them." (more)
1863/03/11J. C. Williams, 14th Regiment, wrote: "Col. Blunt, the ranking Colonel in the brigade, is again in command." (more)
1863/03/12J. C. Williams, 14th Regiment, wrote: "Weather still changeable, clear and beautiful overhead, while beneath the mud is almost fathomless." (more)
1863/03/13J. C. Williams, 14th Regiment, wrote: "The mud is so deep that drilling has been dispensed with for the present." (more)
1863/03/14J. C. Williams, 14th Regiment, wrote: "Fairfax Station is becoming a place of considerable importance in a military point of view, as being a base for supplies to the army, and a depot for Government stores, which we are at present guarding." (more)
1863/03/15J. C. Williams, 14th Regiment, wrote: "Drilling has again been resumed." (more)
1863/03/17J. C. Williams, 14th Regiment, wrote: "Night has again closed the labors of another day, hiding from our view the desolated scenes of earth." (more)
1863/04/04J. C. Williams, 14th VVI: Nothing has occurred of general interest during the past week, save the usual routine of camp and picket duty, there being plenty of that to perform. (more)
1863/04/06J. C. Williams, 14th VVI: Another foot of snow this morning, and rail fences are getting scarce. I have often heard of the sunny South, and that the "sacred soil” of Virginia would be a lovely place on which to dwell, but I cannot see the point. (more)
1863/04/08J. C. Williams, 14th VVI: No battle with the "rebs” to record yet. The 14th is now the headquarters of the brigade. (more)
1863/04/09J. C. Williams, 14th VVI: Nothing from Stuart yet. He has doubtless escaped at some other point. (more)
1863/04/10J. C. Williams, 14th VVI: The "grand Army of the Potomac” still inactive. How much longer shall the nation be kept in suspense, awaiting the movements of our armies? (more)
1863/04/11J. C. Williams, 14th VVI: Day before yesterday was the day appointed by the President for the nation to fast, and I fear it was not strictly observed in camp, as far as abstaining from eating and drinking are concerned (more)
1863/04/12J. C. Williams, 14th VVI: The weather is again very fine this morning, and the brass band has been giving us some of its most beautiful pieces. (more)
1863/04/13J. C. Williams, 14th VVI: We have just received the sad intelligence of the death of Sergeant C. P. Taylor of Company B., who was left at Fairfax Station, sick with the measles, at the time of our move here. (more)
1863/04/15J. C. Williams, 14th VVI: Orders have been received to be ready to take the field at a moment's notice, with seven days' rations. I will here remark, that we have never but once been without marching orders since being in the service. (more)
1863/04/16J. C. Williams, 14th VVI: It has been ascertained that the 14th numbers more men, fit for duty, than any other regiment in the brigade. (more)
1863/04/17J. C. Williams, 14th VVI: We are no longer in the reserve corps for the defense of Washington, but will hereafter form a part of the army in the field. (more)
1863/04/18J. C. Williams, 14th VVI: No move yet, and mere conjecture where we shall go when we do move. (more)
1863/04/19J. C. Williams, 14th VVI: Seven days' rations are still on hand, ready for a move. (more)
1863/04/20J. C. Williams, 14th VVI: How I wish Gen. Grant had the command of the Army of the Potomac, and would commit one of his blunders, and capture Richmond, together with thirty thousand prisoners. (more)
1863/04/21J. C. Williams, 14th VVI: Drilling as usual. The ground is now all settled, trees are in full blossom, and all nature has assumed a new attire (more)
1863/04/22J. C. Williams, 14th VVI: Reveille at half past five in the morning, when the voice of the Orderly is heard -- fall in for roll call! (more)
1863/04/23J. C. Williams, 14th VVI: Col. Stannard of the 9th Vt. is about to be promoted to a Brigadier, and to have command of this brigade. (more)
1863/04/24J. C. Williams, 14th VVI: Plenty of drilling at present -- think we shall be well prepared for a march when the order comes. (more)
1863/04/26J. C. Williams, 14th VVI: The regiment is in good spirits to-day, ready for anything which may turn up in the line of marching or fighting. Liberty and justice are at stake. (more)
1863/04/27J. C. Williams, 14th VVI: The Paymaster is again in our camp, laden with "green backs" to pay us off. (more)
1863/04/28J. C. Williams, 14th VVI: Recent circumstances indicate that the campaign is about to open, and much confidence is felt in Hooker, and that victory awaits our arms. (more)
1863/04/29J. C. Williams, 14th VVI: Six long months have elapsed since I have enjoyed the pleasant associations of the family circle, and long for the time to come when I may be permitted to return to the joys of civil life. (more)
1863/04/30J. C. Williams, 14th VVI: About ten o'clock, firing was heard on the picket line, and soon the long roll-call was beaten, calling the men to arms. (more)
1863/06/23Frederick L. Reed, Orderly Sergt., Co. D, 14th Vermont: Received orders to be ready to move. I hope we will not go. Nothing new in camp to-day only all are wondering where we are going. A.J.D. has gone to bed and I must go. I hope to have a good night's rest. (Memorial Exercises, Castleton VT 1885)
1863/06/24Frederick L. Reed, Orderly Sergt., Co. D, 14th Vermont: Wolf Run Shoals. Boys getting ready to move in the morning. They all feel well about moving. We have got to carry three days' rations. Wrote a letter to x. A.D.D. has gone to bed and I must follow his example, so farewell. (Memorial Exercises, Castleton VT, 1885)
1863/06/252nd Brigade, bringing up the rear of the Army of the Potomac, started a march to Gettysburg. (Dyer)
1863/06/25Frederick L. Reed, Orderly Sergt., Co. D, 14th Vermont: Camp in the woods, one mile north of Centerville. Started from Wolf Run, 7 this morning. It rained all night; we are all feeling well; nothing to eat, only hard tack. (Memorial Exercises, Castleton VT, 1885)
1863/06/26Frederick L. Reed, Orderly Sergt., Co. D, 14th Vermont: Camp near harrington Station in a meadow. We marched very slow to-day; all are feeling good. I am a little sore footed but I am bound to stand it. This is a nice country. We expect to see fighting to-morrow. It has been a good day to march.

(Memorial Exercises, Castleton VT, 1885)
1863/06/27Frederick L. Reed, Orderly Sergt., Co. D, 14th Vermont: Camp near Edward's Ferry, Md. Marched 20 miles; very tired to-night; feet blistered. Troops passed all night; we met all the boys at the Ferry. Crossed the Potomac on pontoons. There is a big force with us. I wanted to write this morning but cannot send letters. (Memorial Exercises, Castleton VT, 1885)
1863/06/28Frederick L. Reed, Orderly Sergt., Co. D, 14th Vermont: Camp near Adamstown. Marched all day. Adamstown was a very nice little place. I see five or six nice looking ladies. the Rebs were in this town last night bet have gone to-day. Paid fifty cents for a loaf of bread. (Memorial Exercises, Castleton VT, 1885)
1863/06/29Frederick L. Reed, Orderly Sergt., Co. D, 14th Vermont: Camp eight miles out of Frederick. Marched all day; Oh how tired I am to-night; one man from our company fell out; we do not know whether he is dead or not. I had a good swig of whiskkey to-day, it does me more good than anything. (Memorial Exercises, Castleton VT, 1885)
1863/06/30Frederick L. Reed, Orderly Sergt., Co. D, 14th Vermont: Camp at Emmittsburg. We have marched one hundred and ten miles since we started. this is a splendid country; I never saw anything to beat it. We expect to see fighting before long. My feet are so sore I hardly can step on them. Paid one dollar for a loaf of bread. One of our company fell out and we had to leave him; we do not know where he is. (Memorial Exercises, Castleton VT, 1885)
1863/07/01Frederick L. Reed, Orderly Sergt., Co. D, 14th Vermont: Started from Emmittsburg at 10 a.m.; arrived at Gettysburgh at 5 p.m. I see artillery fighting, and to-morrow morning we expect to fight like devils. Boys all tired out. It is rather sad to think we have got to fight to-morrow. (Memorial Exercises, Castleton VT, 1885)
1863/07/02Frederick L. Reed, Orderly Sergt., Co. D, 14th Vermont: This morning we are all getting ready to go into the fight; perhaps this is the last time I shall ever write in this book * * * * * * No it was not; thank God for it; such a fight I never want to see again. Sam. Fisk was wounded. Oh such a roar of cannon no man ever heard! (Memorial Exercises, Castleton VT, 1885)
1863/07/05Frederick L. Reed, Orderly Sergt., Co. D, 14th Vermont: Advanced this morning at 10 a.m. I hardly think we shall see any more fighting. Company D was detached for guard for the Hospital. We are in hopes to remain here until our time expires; I hope we will. (Memorial Exercises, Castleton VT, 1885)
1863/07/06Frederick L. Reed, Orderly Sergt., Co. D, 14th Vermont: A very fine day to-day. Jim. Goodrich and myself went to a house and got breakfast; this is the first time I have had anything to eat since we left the Run. This is a pleasant place where we are. (Memorial Exercises, Castleton VT, 1885)
1863/07/07Frederick L. Reed, Orderly Sergt., Co. D, 14th Vermont: Went out foraging to-day; got a good dinner, 8 lbs butter, six loaves of bread 50 cts. a loaf, 40 bushels corn, 8 bushels rye, and some straw to lie on; we are not going to starve as long as there is anything to be bought. We now and then hear a report of a cannon. (Memorial Exercises, Castleton VT, 1885)
1863/07/08Frederick L. Reed, Orderly Sergt., Co. D, 14th Vermont: I do not feel well to-day; I have not got over the fight yet. I am almost used up. It has rained almost all day. to-night it is pleasant, I would give five dollars if I could hear from Benson, but I cannot. (Memorial Exercises, Castleton VT, 1885)
1863/07/09Frederick L. Reed, Orderly Sergt., Co. D, 14th Vermont: Very pleasant day to-day. I slept almost all day. We are having gay times; plenty to eat; that suits us; yes it does. (Memorial Exercises, Castleton VT, 1885)
1863/07/10Frederick L. Reed, Orderly Sergt., Co. D, 14th Vermont: Dick Hibbard and myself went down to the city of Gettysburgh to-day; we took dinner at the hotel. The houses are completely pierced with bullet holes; it is or was a very pretty place. (Memorial Exercises, Castleton VT, 1885)
1863/07/11Frederick L. Reed, Orderly Sergt., Co. D, 14th Vermont: Sick to-day, I would like to be at home for I am a little afraid of a fever. It is very warm. I paid one dollar for a loaf of bread to-day; my money will soon be gone if I keep on. (Memorial Exercises, Castleton VT, 1885)
1863/07/3014th Regiment mustered out at Brattleboro, having lost during service 1 Officer and 26 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 43 Enlisted men by disease. Total 70. (Dyer)
1937/09/24English L. Maynard , the last known survivor of the 14th VT INF, died in Fair Haven.