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4th Vermont Infantry
Personal Papers
The Henry B. Atherton Collection

Stephen L. Taylor

Washington DC, 10 March, 1862

to: Capt. H. B. Atherton, Co. "C", 4th Reg't. Vt. Vols., Camp Griffin, Va.

From: S. L. Taylor, General Hospital, Box 436

Captain Atherton, Dear Sir: I improve this opportunity to write you a few lines and how my health is &c. Since I wrote last, I have had the measles and had them very harsh. I was sick four weeks. They came very near killing me. The nurse gave me up three times and went to the Doctor every time. But I came out safe once more. I am very weak yet, not fit for duty. The first of February I was removed to a new hospital which the same man has charge of that did the other and have been made Ward Master here which is much easier for me than being an attendant. About one-half of my time is occupied only, and that is in visiting &c and seeing that the work is done in a proper manner. I get 25 cents a day for extra duty, sick or well. I received the descriptive list you sent but have not tried to get my pay yet. There has been a great move of troops here from the last few days. The Regulars are crossing the River today; some of them went a day or two ago. The people here are in expectation of a great move over there before long. I hope this War will soon be over and we shall be discharged. I do not seem to have very good luck here. I have been sick more since I left home than I ever was before. I hope you will visit soon. I want to know where you are

&c. &c. &c. Very Respectfully Yours, S.L. Taylor.

[This soldier had very good handwriting. Stephen L. Taylor, b. Weathersfield, Vt., 21 Dec., 1842, son of Reuben L. & Marilla E. (Upham) Taylor. He enlisted from Weathersfield, Vt. at the age of 19 years, 27 Aug., 1861, and was mustered in to Co. "C", 4th Vt. Regiment, 21 Sept., 1861. He was discharged for disabilities, 13 May, 1862, about two months after he sent this letter to Captain Atherton. After he went home, he headed to the West. Stephen m. in Geneva, Illinois, 1 May, 1867, Julia Sterling (b. Illinois, 10 March, 1840, dau. of Samuel & Cornelia (Lathrop) Sterling). They lived in Geneva (Kane Co.) Illinois when the 1870 census was taken. Stephen graduated from the University of Michigan and entered the field of journalism. At the time of his marriage he was associate editor of the Western Rural in Chicago, residing at that time at Elmhurst, Illinois. Stephen was employed as a "newspaper publisher" in Geneva where he purchased the Geneva Republican and later founded the St. Charles Transcript. Living with them in 1870, was Stephen's single brother Edward (age 18), working as a farm laborer. In 1871, the family moved to Elgin, Illinois where Stephen commenced the publication of the Elgin Advocate which he owned and operated until the time of his death, 16 Nov., 1880. His widow Julia applied for a widow's pension in 1881 (Application No. 300,264; Certificate No. 673,160), and lived with her son in Elgin. In 1890, Julia was living in Ann Arbor (Washtenaw County) Michigan, where she remained a widow. Children: (1) Lucian S. Taylor, (b. b. Geneva, Illinois, 22 July, 1868. He m. Bessie E. Farrel); (2) Morilla Taylor, b. Elgin, Illinois, 10 March, 1872, a student at Ann Arbor University in Michigan when she d. 8 April, 1898.]


This document is from the Henry B. Atherton Collection, contributed by Linda M. Welch, genealogist and historian of southern Windsor County, Vermont towns. She has many more of these letters and is planning to publish a book in the near future which will include them all."