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Vermont Artillery

Second Battery Light Artillery
Biography
William Porter Whitney

William Porter Whitney, son of Oliver Whitney and Rebecca Nichols, was born on February 12, 1825 in Rochester, Windsor County, Vermont. [1]He married on September 22, 1852 Roxa Arvilla Kinsman. [2] The marriage occurred at Brandon, Vermont and was performed by Rev. Mr. Loveland. [3] Roxa was born in Vermont about 1839, the daughter of Dura Kinsman and Mary Town. From the time of their marriage, William and Roxa lived on a farm about one mile from Dura Kinsman in the same school district. [4] Up to 1862, William often worked for Dura Kinsman. [5]

In 1860, William and "Arvilla" were living in Rochester where William was a farmer with real estate worth $800 and with personal assets of $200. [6]For the fiscal year 1859-60, William Whitney's farm statistics reveal the following:

Acres of improved land40Wheat,bushels25
Acres of unimproved land100Oats,bushels120
Value of farm$800Buckwheat, bushels10
Value of farm implements$20Irish potatoes, bushels70
Horses1Wool, pounds50
Milk cows2Butter, pounds150
Working oxen2Hay, tons15
Other cattle3Other grasses, bushels20
Sheep20Maple sugar, pounds175
Swine1Value animals slaughtered$31[7]
Value of livestock$170

William and his family resided in Rochester, Vermont 5 1/2 years before he decided to enlist and serve in the Civil War. [8] In February 1862, Dura Kinsman "carried [William] to Brandon" after he enlisted. [9]William enrolled for three years at Rochester, Vermont on January 20, 1862 as a Private in the 2 nd Battery, Vermont Light Artillery Volunteers. [10]

Lucius J. Baker was a Private in the 2 nd Battery and first met Whitney when Whitney joined the Battery at Boston, Massachusetts in February 1862. The Battery proceeded immediately from Boston by water to Ship Island, Louisiana. [11] From the first until Baker's discharge he messed and tented with Whitney. [12]

While on duty at Ship Island, Mississippi on or about March 10, 1862 William Whitney became sick with measles. He became wholly disabled from doing duty and received treatment from the surgeon at his quarters about two weeks. [13] David Root who was a neighbor of William before and after the war in Rochester, also accompanied William on board the ship Idaho enroute to New Orleans. Root recalled that Whitney contracted the measles and chronic diarrhea while aboard the Idaho. They arrived at Ship Island in March 1862. Whitney was treated by a surgeon whose name David Root never knew. [14]

Lucius Baker stated that "about the time of their arrival at Ship Island [Whitney] came down sick with the measles, and was sick therewith in camp; and after his recovery he was again at the same place in the month of April 1862 taken sick with diarrhea attended with bloody discharges and was sick in camp therewith for some days. [Whitney] got better but had a recurring attack of such diarrhea in the month of June 1862 at Camp Parapet , Louisiana and had spells of the same diarrhea from time to time." [15]

John Dutton moved to the West Hill area of Rochester in 1856 and became acquainted with William Whitney and soon after knew him well. John recalled that "we enlisted same day & hours & minutes and tented & bunked & slept to gather most of the time." [16] "We bunked near each other on the ship Idaho from Boston to Ship Island, Mississippi. After we landed we were put in the same tent and tented together until he was discharged." [17]Very soon after becoming sick with measles, he had an attack of chronic diarrhea followed with what was called bloody piles. [18]John Laffie, a fellow soldier, recalled "On June 6, 1862 while in the line of duty near Camp Parapet, Louisiana, [Whitney] incurred diarrhea. The cause of the diarrhea was due to impure water and change of climate. [19]

John further stated that Whitney "had been complaining in regard to diarrhea all the way from Ship Island to New Orleans."  Laffie and Whitney were in the same detachment and tented together. [20]

John Dutton remembered "Whitney continued on light duty until we went to New Orleans about the month of May 1862. About this time he was attacked with the piles. I heard him frequently complain of these piles and know of his doctoring for them. Whitney had several different attacks of the diarrhea and they were so severe that he was excused from duty most of the time and only light duty was performed by him at other times." [21]

Whitney resumed duty with the Battery and continued with the Battery until sometime in September or October 1862. Then he then had an attack of fever and ague at Camp Parapet, Louisiana. He was excused from duty several days; then went on duty with his Battery. During the last days of November 1862, he suffered with dumb ague at Camp Parapet and was excused from duty to about December 19, 1862. [22]

John Laffie also recalled "On or about October 15, 1862, while on duty at or near Camp Parapet, Whitney "became sick with chills and fever, followed by what is called the dumb ague, and at the same time rheumatism in the hips and back. [Whitney] was at the time engaged in camp duty. The cause of the chills and fever, followed by dumb ague and rheumatism was the dampness of the surroundings; the surrounding country being a swamp - combined with the hot weather." [23]

Recalling the fever and ague he contracted in October, 1862, William Whitney said " [I] had the chills and Fever or in other words fever and Ague, off duty and on until Oct 27 at this date I came down with the Dumb ague that lasted me until the 16 of Nov some 20 days, and it well nigh used me up the colored cook afterwards told me that he for some days considered me done gone up ..." [24]

Part of William's "camp duty" was performing as a nurse. Alonzo E. Lord, from Brandon, Vermont, was in the hospital at Camp Parapet and met William. He recalled "while in the service I was in the hospital at Camp Parapet , LA and that Whitney was a nurse in said hospital and that he suffered with piles. I know for he shewed them to me. They were down at times to the size of a butternut." [25]

William received an injury of his left testicle at Donaldsonville, Louisiana in February 1863. [26] The injury occurred about February 14 or 23, 1863. [27]While riding in the saddle on horseback, the testicle became very much swollen and painful resulting in a rupture that produced a scrotal hernia. [28] The Battery was being drilled as Cavalry under command of Lieutenant John W. Chase. [29] Sergeant P.A. Baker went with William to the surgeon when the injury occurred. William recalled "I hoped all the while to recover from the injury and only mentioned it to my most intimate comrades." [30]

"In February 1863," Dutton recalled, "I knew of the Company going out at Donaldsonville, LA for a drill as Cavalry drill and I know of Whitney going out. I was detailed as cook at the time and did not go. I saw him when he came back. He came in as a stragler [sic] and reported that he had hurt his left testicle. I have seen it and it is swollen as large as a goose egg. I knew of these circumstances from my own personal observation as we were old acquaintances and entered at the same time and from the same neighborhood. [31]

John Laffie further remembered: "About January 27, 1865 as Whitney and I were out after cane poles at Port Hudson, Whitney had occasion to vacuate, and at this time he showed me his left testicle and it was as large as my fist and I also saw his piles at this time." [32]

William was honorably discharged at Baton Rouge, Louisiana on January 30, 1865. [33]John Laffie was discharged at the same time and came home with him and assisted him. [34]

When William P. Whitney arrived at Brandon after his discharge from the Army in February 1865, Dura Kinsman brought him from Brandon to Rochester. At that time, Dura stated that William "was sick at that time with the chronic diarrhea and suffering from the Rheumatism in the back and hips from which, in my opinion, he has never recovered, but grown worse year by year, his backbone is humped and twisted and curved off to the left, and his left testicle looks as large as a goose egg. This he says he got hurt on the saddle drilling as cavalry, and is very painful a portion of the time, and the piles seem to trouble him very much indeed which it seems he contracted there in the service." [35]

"When Whitney came home in Feb of 1865 he went into and lived in one of my houses, only about 50 rods from me and lived there until fall so that I saw him most every day. Was not able to perform any personal labor at all for some time and do not think that he was to do half of a mans work at any time during the year 1865, say only one fourth and I have worked with him more or less since that date and to the best of my knowledge and belief he never recovered so as to be able to do more than one half of a mans work in any one year since his return. I have seen him quite a number of times during the last two months and do know that the rheumatism had got into his arms to such and extent that he is wholly unable to perform any manual labor at all. That I do not think that he has been able to perform any more that one fourth of a mans labor that last three years, in fact some of the time in the last named years, he had been totally unfit to perform manual labor of any kind." [36]

Henry M. Ferris of Brandon knew William very well. Ferris saw William after the war in the summer of 1865. Ferris noted that "he was suffering from rheumatism - seemed to be very bad off - his back was bent; and he was lame - unfit to perform manual labor at that time." Ferris subsequently saw William very often and "worked for him in haying." Ferris recalled "I worked for him at half price as I was disabled, and I think he was totally disabled for the performance of manual labor at that time. [37]

David Root was a neighbor of Whitney since the close of the war in 1865. David recounted "he has been a constant sufferer from [his] diseases every day since that date, more or less severe. His testicle is very large and very painful at times, it being now as large as a large goose egg. I see him very often and he is unable to do manual labor requiring much exertion, but can work at light work, some. I should say that he can work at light work about half the time". [38]

William continued to work his farm on West Hill in Rochester after the war. William and his family were still farming in Rochester in 1870 [39] and 1880. [40] For the fiscal year 1879-80, William Whitney's farm statistics reveal the following:

acres of land improved, tilled20calves dropped1
acres of meadow & orchard20cattle purchased1
acres of woodland90pounds of butter made300
cash value of farm$500poultry on hand, barnyard16
cash value of implements$40eggs produced in 1879, dozen200
value of live stock$140potatoes, Irish:
value of all farm productions$275     acres 1
acres of grassland, mown15     bushels150
acres of grassland not mown5acres of apple orchard1/2
tons of hay15Apple bearing trees20
horses2bushels of apples8
milk cows2value of orchard products$2
other cattle2cords of wood cut16
value of forest products$32[41]

In 1880, at the age of 55, William was 5 feet, five inches tall with dark complexion, dark hair, and blue eyes. [42]

In 1883, William was still in Rochester, now farming 80 acres. [43] Apparently, early in 1883, William sold his farm in West Rochester. Lyn Jones, 76, recalled on November 21, 1884 that "Since [Whitney's] return from the service I have lived nearly all time within about a mile of him, until he disposed of the land on which he had been living, about 18 months ago, since which he has been about town most of the time and I have met him frequently." [44]

After disposing of his farm, William relocated to South Gardner, Massachusetts in November 1883 where he and his family were residing with friends. On February 18, 1884, he wrote from South Gardner to the Bureau of Pensions pleading for an increase in his pension because of his increasing debilities. He lamented that "As we had no home of our own, and once used to live here, we came here to see our friends last November and intend to stay until spring. I have had work most of the time and so has my wife and we have a little girl to care for and I have got wages for only 25½ days and only 50 cts a day amounting to only $12.75 now for weeks. I have been working for my board and it is so tax on me to earn that."  William went to say that "it would be but a few days of sickness to make us the objects of charity." [45] Whitney was unable to furnish testimony of a physician showing treatment for rheumatism, piles, and injury of left testicle since his discharge because "he has lived far back on the hill [in Rochester] 8 miles from the nearest physician, and has had a family to support and from poverty and lack of means has been unable to employ a physician for himself." [46]

Lyn Jones, further recalled in 1884 that "I have worked with him [William P. Whitney] a good deal both before and after his service in the army. I saw him in February, 1865, immediately after he got home. He was much changed, was very thin and haggard, was weak and unable to work at all. He complained of chronic diarrhea, piles, and rheumatism in the back, and his back was and still is bent or humped." [47] Lyn went on to say that "from his return up to about four or five years ago, I used to work with [Whitney] from time to time. When [Whitney] first returned he was totally disabled, but he got some better and always worked all that he was able. He has always since his return complained of rheumatism in his back and his appearance shows that he has a serious trouble with that part. More recently has complained of its extending to his arms. He has also complained of trouble with piles and I have known him to have to stop work, and to stop walking until he could get relief by pushing them back when they would be down, and very painful and troublesome. He has also frequently complained of trouble with his testicle and that he suffered pain therefrom. For the last three or four years so far as I can judge, he grows worse, and I think he is now able to do but very little manual labor." [48]

Whitney received a pension of $6 per month commencing February 5, 1865; and $12 per month from 30 Sep 1885 for piles and rheumatism resulting disease of back. [49] From January 16, 1889 he received $16 per month for the same conditions. [50]In July, 1889, William was still receiving a pension of $16 per month for disability resulting from piles and rheumatism and resulting disease of back. However, he believed he was entitled to an increase in pension "on account of injury to testicle which was in former application but nothing done about it." [51] In January, 1898, still living in Rochester, William was receiving $17 per month for his disabilities, including the injury to his left testicle. By this date however, at age 72, he was entirely unable to perform any manual labor. In the last 10 years, his height had shrunk by two inches to 5 feet 2 inches tall and he weighed 130 pounds. His entire spinal column had been radically affected by rheumatoid arthritis. He had lateral curvature to the right in upper dorsal region, and to the left in upper lumbar region, about one inch in each location. Also antero-posterior curvature in the dorsal region, four inches in extent. [52]

In June, 1899, William was living in Liberal, Barton County, Missouri near the Kansas border. He had recently tried again to get an increase in his pension. However, he had received a response from the Commissioner of Pensions that he was drawing all that he was entitled to. William responded by asking "I want to respectively ask you if a case of the rheumatism where it deprives one from walking any distance deprives him of dressing himself or milking or doing anything that requires one third of a common man's strength is that a light matter. Because its name is Rheumatism I would ask and then again an injury to the back that bows over depriving him from lifting a ten pound weight above his head  do these things do any because they are an ailment of the back are to be passed over lightly. I have been out a most ayears [sic] hoping to gain strenth [sic] but am not as strong as when I came here. I intend to back east in a very few months. I am sure my attorney wont let up." [53]

In 1900, William was living alone on his farm in Rochester, [54] while his wife was living with their daughter, Eula Bailey and her husband in Rochester. [55]

William died on February 14, 1901 at the age of 76 in Rochester. [56] At the time of his death, William P. Whitney was still being pensioned at $17 per month. Two weeks later, his wife, Roxa, died at the age of 65 on March 1, 1901. [57]Children, all born in Vermont: [58] (WHITNEY surname)

  i. Hattie E.; b. 30 Nov 1853; at home in 1860 & 1870; m. 6 Sep 1873  Charles Bowman.

ii. Ernest L.; b. 23 Jan 1855; m. Ella Patrick; resided in Williamsburg, KS in  1895.

iii. Arthur H.; b. 10 Mar 1857 or 1858; m. Mamie Ivey. Lived in Williamsburg, KS in 1895.

iv.  William B.; b. 11 Dec 1860; in 1880 at age 20, he was a farm laborer living within the household of Frank Huzzy, an Irish farmer, in Rochester; [59] unmarried; resided in Rochester.

  v.   Emma Luella; b. 4 Jun 1866; at home in 1880; m. Edgar Eddy; lived in  Gardner, MA in 1895.

vi. Eula B.; b. 22 May 1876; at home in 1880; married ca. 1898 George  Bailey. In 1900, they were living in Rochester where George rented a  farm. That year, Eula's mother, "Arvilla Whitney" was living with  them. [60]

 

Contributed by William J. Powers, Jr., Lake Dunmore, VT., wjpowers@lakedunmorevt.com .


Footnotes:

[1] Formerly Goshen, Addison County, Vermont.

[2] Pierce, Frederick Clifton. The Descendants of John Whitney, Who Came from London, England to Watertown, Massachusetts in 1635 . Press of W. B. Conkey Company, 341 Dearborn Street, Chicago, Ill. 1895. Pages 523-4.

[3] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Department of Interior, Bureau of Pensions, Washington, DC. 15 Dec 1898.

[4] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Statement. Dura Kinsman, 22 Nov 1882.

[5] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Statement. Dura Kinsman, 22 Nov 1882.

[6] Census, 1860, Vermont, Windsor County, Rochester, P.O. Rochester, 4 Jun 1860, p. 25/273.

210/197

Whitney, Wm         35 m        Farmer    800          200          VT

         Arvilla    21 f                                            VT

         Hattie     8 f                                            VT

         John       6 m                                            VT

         Wm.        5 m                                           VT

[7] Agricultural Census, 1860, Vermont, Windsor County, Rochester, p. 9. William Whitney.

[8] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Letter of William P. Whitney. 16 Oct 1882.

[9] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Statement. Dura Kinsman, 22 Nov 1882.

[10] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. War Department, Adjutant General's Office, Washington, DC. 26 Jul 1882.

[11] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Affidavit. Lucius J. Baker, 42. Blue Earth County, Minnesota on 2 Dec 1884.

[12] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Affidavit. Lucius J. Baker, 42. Blue Earth County, Minnesota on 2 Dec 1884.

[13] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Declaration for Original Invalid Pension, 10 Jun 1880.

[14] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Affidavit. David Root, 47, 3 Aug 1883.

[15] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Affidavit. Lucius J. Baker, 42. Blue Earth County, Minnesota on 2 Dec 1884.

[16] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Statement. John Dutton, Brandon, Vermont, 18 Dec 1884.

[17] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Proof of Disability. Statement. John Dutton, 14 Aug 1883.

[18] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Declaration for Original Invalid Pension, 10 Jun 1880.

[19] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Affidavit to Origin of Disability. John Laffie, 49, of Forestdale, Vermont.

[20] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Affidavit to Origin of Disability. John Laffie, 30 Oct 1884.

[21] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Proof of Disability. Statement. John Dutton, 14 Aug 1883.

[22] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Declaration for Original Invalid Pension, 10 Jun 1880.

[23] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Affidavit to Origin of Disability. John Laffie, 49, of Forestdale, Vermont.

[24] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Letter of William P. Whitney, 17 Oct 1882.

[25] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Statement. Alonzo E. Lord, Brandon, Vermont 17 Dec 1884.

[26] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Department of Interior, Pension Office, 23 May 1882.

[27] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Inability Affidavit. William P. Whitney. [no date].

[28] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Declaration for Original Invalid Pension, 10 Jun 1880; and Letter of William P. Whitney. 16 Oct 1882.

[29] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Affidavit. David Root, 47, 3 Aug 1883.

[30] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Inability Affidavit. William P. Whitney. [no date].

[31] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Proof of Disability. Statement. John Dutton, 14 Aug 1883.

[32] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Affidavit to Origin of Disability. John Laffie, 49, of Forestdale, Vermont.

[33] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Declaration for Original Invalid Pension, 10 Jun 1880.

[34] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Affidavit to Origin of Disability. John Laffie, 30 Oct 1884.

[35] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Statement. Dura Kinsman, 22 Nov 1882.

[36] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Statement. Dura Kinsman, 22 Nov 1882.

[37] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. General Affidavit. 16 Oct 1884. Henry M. Ferris, 55 of Brandon, Vermont.

[38] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Affidavit. David Root, 47, 3 Aug 1883.

[39] Census, 1870, Vermont, Windsor County, Rochester, P.O. Rochester, 10 Jun 1870, p. 23/489.

183/183

Whitney, William   44 m        Farmer    ----           ----           VT

         Arvilla   33 f        Keeping House                     VT

         Heattie   16 f                                              VT

         Earnest   14 m                                                VT

         Arthur    12 m                                                VT

         Willie     9 m                                                VT

         Luella     4 f                                                VT

[Note: No agricultural census from for William Whitney in 1870.]

[40] Census, 1880, Vermont, Windsor County, Rochester, p. 225C (T9-1350).

 

???/???

Whitney, William  self       m m 55    Farmer           VT VT VT

         Arvilla  wife       m f 44    Keeping House    VT VT VT

         Leulla   dau        m f 14                     VT VT VT

         Eula B. dau       s f 4                     VT VT VT

[41] Agricultural Census, 1880, Vermont, Windsor County, Rochester, ED 260, 19 Jun 1880, page 18. Name: William Whitney. [UVM, Bailey/Howe Microforms (microfilm) (2nd Floor), call number: MICROFILM 629.]

[42] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Declaration for Original Invalid Pension, 10 Jun 1880.

[43] Child, Hamilton. Gazetteer and Business Directory of Windsor County, Vermont for 1883-4 . Syracuse, NY: Printed at the Journal Office. January 1884. [NEHGS F 57 W7 C5 1884]. Page 464: Whitney, William P., (Rochester) farmer 80.

[44] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Statement of Lyn Jones. 21 Nov 1884.

[45] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Letter. South Gardner, Mass, 18 Feb 1884.

[46] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Affidavit of Claimant as to Inability to Furnish Medical evidence.

[47] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Statement of Lyn Jones. 21 Nov 1884.

[48] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Statement of Lyn Jones.  21 Nov 1884.

[49] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Original Invalid Claim. William P. Whitney.

[50] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Invalid Pension.

[51] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Declaration for the Increase of an Invalid Pension. William P. Whitney, 13 Jul 1889.

[52] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Department of the interior, Bureau of Pensions, Washington, DC 13 Jan 1898. Increase of pension claim.

[53] Civil War Pension Record, William P. Whitney, #310,613. Letter from William P. Whitney. Post mark receipt at Pension Office dated 5 Jun 1899.

[54] Census, 1900, Vermont, Windsor County, Rochester Town, 7 Jun 1900, ED 282, Sht 3, p. 214A.

54/55

Whitney, Wlliam P. head m Feb 1825 75 m 48     VT MA MA          Farmer OFF

[55] Census, 1900, Vermont, Windsor County, Rochester Town, 28 Jun 1900, ED 282, Sht 12 p. 223B.

268/273

Bailey,  Geo.        head       m Jun 1871 27 m 2     VT VT VT        Farmer    RF

         Eula        wife       f May 1876 24 m 2 0 0 VT VT VT

Whitney, Arvilla m in law   f Feb 1836 64 m 48 8 4 VT VT VT

[56] Vermont Vital Records. Death. Whitney, William P., d. Rochester, VT; age 76 years, [no] months, and 2 days; married; occupation – farmer; b. Goshen, VT; father – Oliver Whitney; mother – Rebecca (Nichols); d. 14 Feb 1901 of apoplexy. Rochester, VT.

[57] Vermont Vital Records. Death. Whitney, Roxa Arvilla, d. Rochester, VT; age 65 years and 25 days; widowed; b. Goshen, VT; father – Dura Kinsman; mother – Mary Towne; d. 1 Mar 1901. Rochester, VT.

[58] Pierce, Frederick Clifton. The Descendants of John Whitney, Who Came from London, England to Watertown, Massachusetts in 1635 . Press of W. B. Conkey Company, 341 Dearborn Street, Chicago, Ill. 1895. Pages 523-4.

[59] Census, 1880, Vermont, Windsor County, p. 222A (T9-1350).

???/???

Huzzy, Frank     self   widower m   41   Farmer                    Ire Ire Ire

        Mary      dau    s        f   13                            IL Ire VT

       Emma      dau    s        f    8                             VT Ire VT

       Mattie    dau    s        f    5                             VT Ire VT

Lillie, Carrie    other  s        f   22   Housekeeper          VT VT VT

Whitney, William other  s        m   20    Farm Laborer         VT VT VT

[60] Census, 1900, Vermont, Windsor County, Rochester Town, 28 Jun 1900, ED 282, Sht 12 p. 223B.

 

268/273

Bailey, Geo.     head        m Jun 1871 27 m 2     VT VT VT        Farmer    RF

Eula        wife    f May 1876 24 m 2 0 0 VT VT VT

Whitney, Arvilla m in law     f Feb 1836 64 m 48 8 4 VT VT VT

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