Vermont Flag Site Logo

Currier, George W.

MILITARY SERVICE

Age: 19, credited to Franklin, VT
Unit(s): 1st VT INF, 1st VT CAV
Service: enl 5/2/61, m/i 5/9/61, Pvt, Co. C, 1st VT INF, m/o 8/15/61; enl 9/21/61, m/i 11/19/61, Pvt, Co. B, 1st VT CAV, m/o 11/18/64

See Legend for expansion of abbreviations

VITALS

Birth: 10/28/1842, Franklin, VT
Death: 02/04/1919


MORE INFORMATION

Alias?: None noted
Pension?: Yes, 7/3/1879; widow Lizzie J. F., 8/9/1919
Portrait?: king
College?: Not Found
Veterans Home?: Not Found
(If there are state digraphs above, this soldier spent some time in a state or national soldiers' home in that state after the war)

Remarks: Remains placed in vault in Morrisville, VT.

DESCENDANTS

(Are you a descendant, but not listed? Register today)






Obituary

The death of George W. Currier, a former resident in Morristown, occured at his home in Waterville, Feb. 4, following a general decline since he received injuries from a fall. Funeral services were held at his home Friday afternoon, and the remains were brought to Morrisville and placed in the vault.

George W. Currier was the son of Theophilus Cluff and Lucinda (Danforth) Currier. He was born in Franklin, October 28, 1842. He lived in Franklin and Sheldon until enlisting at St. Albans at the first call for volunteers, serving three months in the infantry, and three years in the 1st Vermont Cavalry, two years of which he served as orderly for Gen. Custer.

On October 2, 1866 Mr Currier was united in marriage to Adeline Mitchell of Sheldon, and followed farming in East Berkshire until coming to Morristown to the farm now occupied by Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Thomas. From this union, two daughters, twins, were born, Ella A., now Mrs. J. F. Thomas, Ella M., who died in infancy. Mrs Currier died April 3, 1906. On December 3, 1911 Mr. Currier united in marriage to Mrs. Lizzie Fletcher, of Waterville, who with his daughter survives.

Mr. Currier was a member of James M. Warner Post, G.A.R., of Morrisville.

Source: Burlington Weekly Free Press, Feb. 13, 1919
Courtesy of Deanna French