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Jones, Samuel H.

MILITARY SERVICE

Age: 26, credited to Hartland, VT
Unit(s): 6th VT INF, VRC
Service: enl 8/18/62, m/i 9/30/62, PVT, Co. C, 6th VT INF, wdd, Banks' Ford, 5/4/63, tr to VRC 7/1/63, m/o 8/21/65

See Legend for expansion of abbreviations

VITALS

Birth: 09/20/1835, Lebanon, NH
Death: 07/31/1922

Burial: Ascutney Cemetery, Windsor, VT
Marker/Plot: Not recorded
Gravestone researcher/photographer: Cathy Hoyt
Findagrave Memorial #: 100290298

MORE INFORMATION

Alias?: None noted
Pension?: Yes, 8/25/1879; widow Harriet B., 9/25/1924, VT, not approved
Portrait?: Unknown
College?: Not Found
Veterans Home?: Not Found
(If there are state digraphs above, this soldier spent some time in a state or national soldiers' home in that state after the war)

Remarks: None

DESCENDANTS

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BURIAL:

Copyright notice

Tombstone

Ascutney Cemetery, Windsor, VT

Check the cemetery for location/directions and other veterans who may be buried there.




Samuel Jones

The Vermont Journal, September 23, 1921

Windsor:

Oldest Man in Windsor, Samuel Jones, Still Sees Music in Life

Samuel Jones, who has made his home in Windsor for several years, celebrated his 86th anniversary at his home on State street, Tuesday evening, September 20. There was a small gathering of friends and relatives there to wish him many more years in the journey of life. He received many remembrances from friends which included beautiful flowers and a nicely ornamented birthday cake, the latter being of original design since it contained the letters, "G.A.R., and the Vermont coat of arms as well as two muskets to symbolize the fact that Mr. Jones was a veteran of the Civil war, having been a member of Company C, Third Vermont infantry.

Mr. Jones was born in the town of Lebanon, N. H., and lived there until his early manhood. When the Civil war began he went to Woodstock, Vt., and in that town together with his three brothers enlisted. He was minus three fingers on his right hand but he said that the examining surgeon, the late Dr. Edward E. Phelps of Windsor, allowed him to pass because they were in need of a man suitable to act as color bearer. Mr. Jones is a tall man, standing six feet and two inches. His zeal to enter the Union cause also helped him to pass the examination officers.

While in the army he was in many of the great battles of the war and was wounded. After the conflict was over Mr. Jones returned to Vermont and has since resided in the towns of Woodstock, Hartland and Windsor. He is remarkable well preserved. He expressed a desire to live until he had reached the century mark and the Journal man told him that there was little doubt that he would reach it if he put his best thought into that desire.

For many years Mr. Jones was a stage driver between the towns of Woodstock and Bethel and also in other parts of the county. He also spent some time as a farmer. But he admits that he has done enough and prefers to take life easy now that he has reached the effective period of life.

Mr. Jones has used tobacco since he was eight years of age and does not know just what he would do if that seductive weed was prohibited by act of Congress. He never smokes but keeps a small wad of fine cut in the corner of his mouth all the day long. No doubt there are many who would like to see him uncomfortable if they could have their way about the tobacco law.

There were four generations present at this anniversary party as follows: Mr. Jones; his daughter, Mrs. Frank Sherwin; his granddaughter, Mrs. Charles Greenlaw, and his great grandchildren, Sherwin Greenlaw and Martha Greenlaw.

Courtesy of Cathy Hoyt.