Vermont Flag Site Logo
Find a Soldier Units Battles Cemeteries Descendants Pensions Towns


March, William J.

MILITARY SERVICE

Age: 18, credited to Colchester, VT
Unit(s): 13th VT INF
Service: enl 9/6/62, m/i10/10/62, Pvt, Co. D, 13th VT INF, kia, Gettysburg, 7/3/63

See Legend for expansion of abbreviations

VITALS

Birth: 1844, Canada
Death: 07/03/1863

Burial: Gettysburg National Cemetery, Gettysburg, PA
Marker/Plot: B/4
Gravestone researcher/photographer: Jennifer Snoots
Findagrave Memorial #: 5490334

MORE INFORMATION

Alias?: None noted
Pension?: Yes, mother Sarah, 5/2/1865
Portrait?: Unknown
College?: Not Found
Veterans Home?: Not Found
(If there are state digraphs above, this soldier spent some time in a state or national soldiers' home in that state after the war)

Remarks: 13th Vt. History off-site

DESCENDANTS

(Are you a descendant, but not listed? Register today)

BURIAL:

Copyright notice

Tombstone

Gettysburg National Cemetery, PA

Check the cemetery for location/directions and other veterans who may be buried there.


BIOGRAPHY

WILLIAM MARCH

Another member of Company D killed at Gettysburg was William March, who, when he enlisted, was a sturdy young carpenter, working on a church in Colchester, Vt., under contractor B, W. Haynes. March was of American stock, son of a widowed mother who lived in LacoUe, P. Q. The writer well remembers, after this long lapse of years, a sad and pathetic interview with this bereaved mother a few weeks after our term expired when she called on him to make inquiry regarding the circumstances of her son's death. She was told the story as follows: Your son was a good and faithful soldier in the field. He kept well and had been able to cheerfully perform all of the duties of a soldier. He marched to Gettysburg with the regiment and during the terrific battle remained at his post until carried off wounded. In the afternoon of the third during the great artillery duel - now celebrated in history - he was wounded in both legs below the knees by cannon shot. He unaided placed tourniquets above the wounds and was carried off the field to a large barn used for a hospital. There he died in an hour. The next morning after the close of the battle, Orderly Sergeant Marrs, E. J. Tyler, J. B. Beauchemin, (the latter one of those who carried him off the field) and the writer procured spades and a blanket and went to the hosi3ital to bury him, when we arrived were told that he had been buried that morning with other dead. When March was taken to the hospital a surgeon - not one of the 13th - took his mother's address, his watch and twenty dollars in money, promising to send them to his mother. She did not receive them. His remains with a host of others lie in the nation's cemetery, beautiful for adornment and for situation close by the nation's monument erected to the nation's dead. His name is chiseled in granite to be read as one who offered the great sacrifice.

J. H. LYON,

Colchester, Vt., December 8th, 1906.

Source: Sturtevant's Pictorial History, Thirteenth Regiment, Vermont Volunteers, War of 1861-1865, p. 538