Vermont Flag Site Logo
Find a Soldier Units Battles Cemeteries Descendants Pensions Towns


Mather, Frederick P.

MILITARY SERVICE

Age: 19, credited to Windsor, VT
Unit(s): 12th VT INF
Service: enl 8/19/62, m/i 10/4/62, Pvt, Co. A, 12th VT INF, m/o 7/14/63

See Legend for expansion of abbreviations

VITALS

Birth: 09/16/1843, Windsor, VT
Death: 12/29/1904

Burial: Brookside Cemetery, Chester, VT
Marker/Plot: Not recorded
Gravestone researcher/photographer: Carolyn Adams

Findagrave Memorial #: 0
(There may be a Findagrave Memorial, but we have not recorded it)

MORE INFORMATION

Alias?: None noted
Pension?: Yes, 4/21/1897, VT
Portrait?: Unknown
College?: Not Found
Veterans Home?: Not Found
(If there are state digraphs above, this soldier spent some time in a state or national soldiers' home in that state after the war)

Remarks: See Benedict's Army Life in Virginia

DESCENDANTS

(Are you a descendant, but not listed? Register today)

BURIAL:

Copyright notice

Tombstone

Tombstone

Brookside Cemetery, Chester, VT

Check the cemetery for location/directions and other veterans who may be buried there.


Obituary

DR. MATHER DEAD

Dr. Frederick P. Mather, who died in Chester Thursday, was a brother of Charles D. Mather, of Mather & Temple, of this city.

Dr. Mather was born in Springfield sixty-one years ago. He has practiced dentistry in Chester since 1867. He was president of the Chester National Bank, a trustee of the Whitney Free library, senior vice-commander of Henry Post, G. A. R., and a member of Olive Branch masonic lodge. He served in Company A, 12th Vermont Volunteers, in the Civil War. In 1882 he represented Chester in the State legislature and in 1892 he was one of Windsor county's senators. From 1900 to 1902 he was president of the State board of dental examiners.

Dr. Mather is survived by a wife, formerly Miss Marcia K. Eaton, of Chester. His first wife was Miss Lovella J. Pollard, of Chester, who died in 1882. Mrs. F. W. Adams, of Chester, is a half-sister.

Source: Montpelier Evening Argus, December 31, 1904.
Courtesy of Tom Boudreau.