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Stetson, Albert C.

MILITARY SERVICE

Age: 23, credited to Whitingham, VT
Unit(s): 16th VT INF
Service: enl 9/3/62, m/i 10/23/62, Pvt, Co. F, 16th VT INF, pr CPL 12/31/62, m/o 8/10/63

See Legend for expansion of abbreviations

VITALS

Birth: 10/10/1838, Wilmington, VT
Death: 04/27/1937

Burial: Jacksonville Cemetery, Whitingham, VT
Marker/Plot: Not recorded
Gravestone researcher/photographer: Tom Boudreau
Findagrave Memorial #: 80681274

MORE INFORMATION

Alias?: None noted
Pension?: Yes, 8/11/1890, VT
Portrait?: Unknown
College?: Not Found
Veterans Home?: Not Found
(If there are state digraphs above, this soldier spent some time in a state or national soldiers' home in that state after the war)

Remarks: None

DESCENDANTS

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BURIAL:

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Tombstone

Jacksonville Cemetery, Whitingham, VT

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Obituary

ALBERT STETSON DIES AT AGE OF 98
Civil War Veteran Succumbs at Home of Daughter
RECORD INCLUDES GETTYSBURG STAND
Member of the 16th Regiment - 75 Years a Mason - Prayer Service to be Held Here Thursday With Funeral in Jacksonville

Albert C. Stetson, one of Brattleboro's oldest residents and last surviving Civil War veterans, died early this morning at the Central street home of his daughter, Mrs. Lottie E. Thomas, with whom he had lived for the past several years. Up to within a few weeks he had been in remarkable health for a man approaching his 99th birthday, his bodily vigor being matched by a mind of unusual clarity.

A prayer service will be held at the Thomas home Thursday at 1 p. m. (D.S.T.) with the funeral in the church at Jacksonville at 3 o'clock. Burial will be in the Jacksonville cemetery.

Mr. Stetson served in the Civil war as a member of Company F, 16th Vermont regiment, taking part in the battles of Beebe's Mills, Fairfax Courthouse, and Gettysburg. In the last named engagement he was with General Stannard's second Vermont brigade.

Albert C Stetson was born in Wilmington Oct. 10, 1838, a son of Ezra and Clarissa (Adams) Stetson, one of their 11 children, of whom only the youngest, Elwin H., of Jacksonville, survives. Of the large family the following four lived to old age - Ezra and Norris died in Jacksonville at the age of 86 and 67 respectively, Emrie died in Boston at the age of 71 and Mrs. Clara (Stetson) Waite died in Boston at the age of 92.

Mr. Stetson first married Lydia A. Wilcox, the ceremony taking place on Feb. 12, 1868. Two children were born to them - Ada M., wife of the late Charles Fox, and who died in 1891, and Frank A. Stetson, who died at the age of three weeks, a few days before the death of his mother on April 26, 1872.

On Dec. 23, 1874 Mr. Stetson married Miss Olive Millington. Their children were: Frank A., who died in 1881; Lottie E., widow of Dr. A. J. Thomas of Brattleboro, with whom Mr. Stetson had lived, and Florence I., who died in 1890.

Postmaster and Lumberman

About six years after the death of his father in 1844, he went to Jacksonville to live with his brother, Norris, who operated a store there. Albert Stetson worked as clerk for his brother and later served as postmaster while the postoffice was located in the store. About 1900 he constructed a small building for the purpose of housing the postoffice.

Mr. Stetson and his younger brother, Elwin, were partners in a lumber mil business 17 years. While working there Mr. Stetson lost his left hand. The brothers sold their mill and in 1902 the property burned, destroying several buildings in the locality, among which was Mr. Stetson's home.

Mr. Stetson has been a Mason nearly 75 years, joining in Wilmington, and was the last charter member of the Unity lodge in Jacksonville.

Besides his daughter, Mrs. Thomas, Mr. Stetson leaves one grandson, Albert Stetson Thomas, a student at Massachusetts State College, and many nephews and nieces.

Source: Brattleboro Reformer, April 27, 1937
Courtesy of Tom Boudreau.