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Holland, George Nathaniel

MILITARY SERVICE

Age: 27, credited to Newfane, VT
Unit(s): 8th VT INF
Service: comn 1LT, Co. I, 8th VT INF, 1/17/62 (1/17/62), resgd 10/25/62

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VITALS

Birth: unknown, Unknown
Death: 06/10/1910

Burial: Congressional Cemetery, Washington, DC
Marker/Plot: 84 - 0.22
Gravestone researcher/photographer: Historic Congressional Cemetery Archivist
Findagrave Memorial #: 49402274

MORE INFORMATION

Alias?: None noted
Pension?: Yes, 3/28/1890, DC
Portrait?: Unknown
College?: Not Found
Veterans Home?: Not Found
(If there are state digraphs above, this soldier spent some time in a state or national soldiers' home in that state after the war)

Remarks: None

DESCENDANTS

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BURIAL:

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Gravestone

Congressional Cemetery, Washington, DC

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Obituary

George Nathaniel Holland, a civil war veteran, died at his Washington, D.C., home Monday, aged 72 years. He was the son of Calvin Holland and was born at Newfane in 1837. His early life was passed in that town, the family living laterat Searsburg and Wilmington, most of his immediate family being buried in the Averill cemetery in the latter town. His uncle, Nathaniel Holland, was proprietor of the Vermont House at West Brattleboro during the 60's. Mr. Holland was a travelling salesman for jewelry prior to the civil war when he enlisted in the 8th Vermont and was made a lieutenant. He participated in many severe engagements, including Cedar Creek inOctober, 1864. He was a warm friend of President Davis of the Confederacy and was given a badge of honor by Mr. Davis for a humane and benevolent act. George N. Holland is pleasantly remembered by many Windham county friends and comrades. He is survived by a son, Calvin, a merchant at Washington.

Source: Brattleboro Reformer, June 10, 1910
Courtesy of Tom Boudreau.