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Westman, Orson C.

MILITARY SERVICE

Age: 19, credited to Cambridge, VT
Unit(s): 2nd VT INF
Service: enl 5/25/61, m/i 6/20/61, PVT, Co. H, 2nd VT INF, pr CPL 9/1/62, reen 1/31/64, wdd, Wilderness, 5/5/64, pr SGT 9/1/64, pr 1SGT 2/8/65, comn 2LT, 6/7/65 (6/28/65), m/o 7/15/65 as 1SGT

See Legend for expansion of abbreviations

VITALS

Birth: 1842, Vermont
Death: 02/04/1896

Burial: Hopkins Cemetery, Cambridge, VT
Marker/Plot: Not recorded
Gravestone researcher/photographer: Deanna French

Findagrave Memorial #: 0
(There may be a Findagrave Memorial, but we have not recorded it)

MORE INFORMATION

Alias?: None noted
Pension?: Yes, 12/29/1890, VT; widow Delia, 6/29/1896, VT
Portrait?: USAHEC off-site
College?: Not Found
Veterans Home?: Not Found
(If there are state digraphs above, this soldier spent some time in a state or national soldiers' home in that state after the war)

Remarks: None

DESCENDANTS

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BURIAL:

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Tombstone

Tombstone

Hopkins Cemetery, Cambridge, VT

Check the cemetery for location/directions and other veterans who may be buried there.


Obituary

CAMBRIDGE MAN DROPS DEAD

Cambridge, Vt., Feb. 4. - Orson Westman, a prosperous farmer and prominent Grand Army man, living in the south part of the town, dropped dead of heart disease in his yard this morning while looking after his cattle.

Lieut. Westman went to the front at the first call for troops, enlisting in the Second Vermont infantry when under 18 years of age and after serving three years, re-enlisted in the same regiment and served until the close of the war. He was in every engagement in which the regiment was engaged, coming out without a scratch or loss of days' service and for faithful service was promoted and mustered out as second lieutenant. He leaves a wife, two sons and one daughter to mourn his loss, along with a host of sympathizing comrades and friends.

Source: Burlington Free Press, February 5, 1896.
Courtesy of Tom Boudreau.