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Young, John A.

MILITARY SERVICE

Age: 15, credited to Chester, VT
Unit(s): USMC
Service: enl 2/65, USMC, dsrtd 3/14/65

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VITALS

Birth: 1850, Unknown
Death: 09/29/1908

Burial: Brookside Cemetery, Chester, VT
Marker/Plot: Not recorded
Gravestone researcher/photographer: Carolyn Adams
Findagrave Memorial #: 111818480

MORE INFORMATION

Alias?: None noted
Pension?: Not found
Portrait?: Unknown
College?: Not Found
Veterans Home?: Not Found
(If there are state digraphs above, this soldier spent some time in a state or national soldiers' home in that state after the war)

Remarks: None

DESCENDANTS

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BURIAL:

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Tombstone

Tombstone

Brookside Cemetery, Chester, VT

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Obituary

KILLED BY A SLIDE
John Young, Quarryman, Buried Under Rocks.

Chester, Sept. 30. - While John Young and E. B. Morris, of this place, were at work in the quarry of the American Soapstone Finish Co., near this village, about 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon, a quantity of rocks and earth weighing at least five tons suddenly slid down upon the men, instantly killing Young. Morris chanced to be near the outer edge of the slide and was pinned to the ground by a large stone. By chance Ernest Carey, who is employed on Sidney Carlton's farm nearby, was watching the men, and after much effort he was able to release Morris, who would have lived but a short time if help had not been given at once. The injured man suffered cuts on the neck, bruise about the body, and one foot was crushed. It is expected that he will live. The two men, Young and Morris, had worked together for twenty-five or thirty years, and for a long time had been employed in getting out the soapstone at the quarry. Young was 68 years old and is survived by a wife. Morris's age is about the same.

Source: St. Albans Weekly Messenger, October 1, 1908.
Courtesy of Tom Boudreau.